LPQ, LPQuarterly

Hot Off the Digital Press: @LPQuarterly 2(3)

With the start of the new academic year, we are pleased to be distributing the new issue of the Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) journal – Volume 2, Issue 3. On behalf of the editorial team, I hope this edition will inform scholars, practitioners and leaders in the learning and performance field.

LPQ_Facebook_Banner

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (ISSN 2166-3564) is a peer-reviewed, open access journal from the Center for Knowledge Solutions at the University of North Texas. The journal takes a broad look at current developments and research that involves innovative learning, training, human resource development, and performance management across academic and professional disciplines.

Learning and Performance Quarterly
Vol 2, No 3 (2014), Table of Contents

Editorial
——–
A New Academic Year, New Learning and Performance Understandings (1)
Laura A. Pasquini,      Tekeshia Zimmerman,     Jeff M. Allen

Invited Articles
——–
Integrated Approach To Building Intercultural Competence (2-15)
Katherine H. Rosenbusch

Research Articles
——–
The Influence of Wiki on Team Effectiveness in a Graduate Research Class (16-34)
Lin Xu, Jessie Cutler,  Jie Xiao,       Holly M. Hutchins

Erikson’s Development Crises: Applying Developmental Theory to Adult Learning (35-48)
Jose Victor Lineros,    Mark E. Fincher

Book Review
——–
Book Review: The Innovator’s DNA (49-50)
Robin James Mayes
______________________________________________
Do you have an article you want to submit?  Our call for proposals is OPEN! Submit your manuscripts to the journal TODAY!

You can review the previous article submissions in the LPQ Archives. We are seeking manuscript submissions for the following categories:

  • Research Articles – Qualitative/Quantitative
  • Concept/Theory Papers
  • Literature Reviews
  • Case Studies
  • Book or Media Reviews
  • Invited Articles
  • Editorials

If you have any questions about potential article submissions, or you are interested in contributing to the Learning and Performance Quarterly editorial team (peer-reviewing, copy editing, layout, etc.) please reach out to myself or the other LPQ Editors.

Thanks for reading,

Dr. Laura A. Pasquini, Editor (@laurapasquini)
Tekeisha D. Zimmerman, Assistant Editor (@TekeishaZ)
Dr. Jeff M. Allen, Managing Editor (@drjeffallen)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#AcWri, Learning Technologies, LPQuarterly, OpenAccess

The @LPQuarterly – Year Two, An Editor’s View, and Volume Two

It is my second year editing and working with the Learning and Performance (a.k.a. @LPQuarterly) here at the University of North Texas.

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (ISSN 2166-3564) is a peer-reviewed, open access journal from the Center for Knowledge Solutions at the University of North Texas. The journal takes a broad look at current developments and research that involves innovative learning, training, human resource development, and performance management across academic and professional disciplines.

Creating an open access, academic writing space from scratch is a bit like a “start up” – it takes a lot of time, investment, tears, creativity, stress, and collaboration (not in any particular order). In being an open educator and seeing academic channels open for scholarly publications, It was only fitting that our agraphia writing/research group from the Department of Learning Technologies consider developing an interdisciplinary, online space for scholars, practioners, and researchers to publish in our field. In coming from the University of Toronto, I knew that the Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) was a student-led, peer review project — so I figured that our talented group could do the same thing.

lpq_logo_enhanced

After reading Karina Quinn’s (a.k.a. @riotk ) blog post, “How to start an Open Access journal,” I thought I could have helped to co-author that post. 🙂 I shared some similar stories and a deep respect for her experiences in open access publishing. So, with that, I thought I would share a few of my lessons learned (from Fall 2011) about the academic publishing process:

  • It takes time to build a journal. TIME!
  • You will have to always CHECK your journal email for communication updates from authors, reviewers, editors and then some. This SHOULD be separate from your personal and work e-mail to keep your life organized, and if your editorial board needs access to the journal email.
  • You can NEVER have enough quality peer reviewers on your roster. Search them out. Invite them. Mentor/support them. Grade and evaluate them with your editorial team.
  • Surround yourself with many talents on your editorial team – think of copyediting, layout, recruitment, and more!
  • Find great scholars and researchers to publish – help to build your street cred and raise the bar for your journal content.
  • Communicate & Market – share what you are doing with different professional associations, student groups, conferences, research listservs, social media outlets, and then some. I started bringing flyers and cards for the journal to places I would go to invite potential authors/researchers, copy editors and most of all peer reviewers.
  • Connect to your friendly neighborhood librarian for advice, indexing, database set up, and then some. They have some GREAT experiences & ideas.
  • Sharpen your editing TOOLS – read books, review websites, watch tutorials, learn about publishing guidelines, school yourself in APA 6th,  talk to other editors, peer review in for other academic journals, and more!
  • Offer developmental writing workshops and opportunities for graduate students and junior scholars, e.g. HOW TO: Effectively Review, Submit & Publish Your Academic Manuscript. . This is a great space for learning, and provides them with opportunities to inquire about academic writing. Also, find experienced scholars and faculty who can share their publication experiences – the good, the rejected, and then some!
  • You will learn new tech skills: read “how to” for the Open Journal System (OJS), linking to EBSCOhost databases, and meta data fun times!
  • Consider how your virtual team will function, meet, and connect on a regular basis to publish issues.
  • Identify a workflow and easy to use spaces for archiving meeting notes, recruitment/marketing material, and communication for your editorial team.
  • Understand your institutional policies for publishing if you are a university. Our university is Open Access, and I’m proud to say that our Provost just signed the latest SPARC agreement to for Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR) bill. What will it mean for an open access publication at YOUR campus?
  • Build in transition and mentoring into your role as an editor. Look for peer reviewers who might be great copy-editors, and consider your change in role as an editor.  I am currently working with our Assistant Editor, Tekeisha Zimmerman, this year who will take on the main editor role for 2014.
  • Never doubt the power of your network. Talk up what you’re doing in person at conferences, when you meet researchers, and get SOCIAL online. We share our call for papers and information about writing on Twitter (@LPQuarterly), our LPQ Facebook Page, and on LinkedIn Groups that are relevant to LPQ.

PUblishing

With the support of the LPQ editorial team, I have been able to work with a number of brilliant contributing authors, peer reviewers, and readers within the fields of education (K-12 and higher ed), learning technology, human resource development, human computer interaction, knowledge management, training and development assessment, and performance management systems. We are currently seeking manuscript submissions for the following categories:

  • Research Articles – Qualitative/Quantitative
  • Concept/Theory Papers
  • Case Studies
  • Book or Media Reviews
  • Invited Articles

If you are interested in submitting an article, the 2013 call for papers is OPEN. Please submit your manuscripts ONLINE today!

For more information or questions, please contact the Learning and Performance Quarterly Editors:
Laura A. Pasquini, Editor
Tekeisha Zimmerman, Assistant Editor
Dr. Jeff M. Allen, Managing Editor
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On behalf of the editorial LP Quarterly team, we invite you to read the current issue, or visit the archives for your research and learning.

Here is the most recent issue,Learning and Performance Quarterly, Vol 2, No 1 (2013) that is…

HOT-OFF-THE-PRESSES

Table of Contents
http://www.sageperformance.com/ojs/index.php/LPQ/issue/view/7

Editorial
——–
Transforming Teaching, Knowledge Management & Performance Measurement
Systems
Laura A. Pasquini,      Tekeisha Zimmerman,     Jeff M. Allen

Invited Articles
——–
Traditional Teaching or Innovative Teaching via Technology?
Victor C.X. Wang,       Patricia Cranton

Concept/Theory Paper
——–
A Conceptual Model for Community of Practice and Its Implications for Human
Resource Development Practice
Hee Sung Lee,   Jeong Rok Oh

Performance Measurement Systems and Culture:  An Integrative Literature
Review
Shelby Danks

Book Review
——–
A Year Up: How a Pioneering Program Teaches Young Adults Real Skills for
Real Jobs with Real Success
Michael F. Koslosk

#AcWri, #phdchat, LPQ

The @LPQuarterly Workshop No. 1 – HOW TO: Effectively Review, Submit & Publish Your Academic Manuscript

To support our graduate students and junior scholars at UNT, with their academic writing development, the Learning and Performance Quarterly hosted its first workshop this past Friday, March 1st.

The purpose of this session was to introduce graduate students to the Learning and Performance Quarterly journal, and engage in a discussion about scholarly peer-review, academic editing, and the publication process. Dr. Kim Nimon & Dr. Jeff Allen shared their experiences and thoughts on the publication process, and what it takes to submit an academic manuscript.

We discussed the steps from submission preparation, through correspondence, and all the way to publication, including:

  • Understanding Academic Journal Types: A, B, & C Level
  • Considering the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) for journal levels
  • Using Google Scholar Citations & being critical with Google Scholar
  • Filtering with the UNT Libraries Search – Summon
  • Researching Academic Journals: Cabell’s Directory (hard copy in library)
  • Scholarly Publication Process – how it helps your academic writing improve
  • Effective Peer Reviewing – comments, feedback & effective suggestions
  • Expectations & Considerations – the typical process is 9-12 months
  • Developing Publishing Relationships – between reviewers & editors AND the editor & author; it’s a human process
  • Attending Conference Sessions with the Editor – bring your manuscript, learn if they need papers, build a rapport
  • key rejection reasons – format, grammar, APA, and theoretical frameworks
  • How to get involved in the academic reviewing & writing process
  • Using a plagiarism checker to review your manuscript before submission
  • Communication with the editor & being timely with your peer reviews

During the session Dr. Nimon shared her own publishing experiences, provided the group with  peer-reviewing and editor correspondence, and talked about what she looks for in academic manuscripts as an editor. 

Although many asked to record the workshop; I decided not to as the open discussion, and Q & A format was really best served in person, and I think the conversation was more candid without the recording.  You can thank the LPQ Assistant Editor, Tekeisha, for compiling notes from this session – here is the summary of what we discussed:

Besides encouraging our attendees to write, we also placed value in joining the peer-review and editing process. We suggested to sign up to review articles for the LP Quarterly AND other journals in their field. Being a peer-reviewer helps junior scholars gain experience in the publishing process, build a rapport with editors, learn about acceptable journal submissions, and hone their own academic writing craft. I suggested reading Rocco and Hatcher’s (2011) book, specifically “Chapter 2 – Publishing in Peer-Reviewed and Non Refereed Journals” to get their feet wet with starting the academic submission process, preparing a manuscript, deciding where to publish, and how to best work with editors.

Although I have seen this session before – I know that I left the workshop with some great takeaways from Dr. Nimon, and helpful ideas shared by scholars who have been through the full academic writing experience from submission to publication. A huge thanks to Dr. Nimon for her time and sharing, Dr. Allen for donating the book giveaways (who doesn’t LOVE winning the Rocco & Hatcher text or APA 6th edition book?), and, most importantly, thank you to those of you who joined us on a Friday night. I appreciate it. 

In our efforts to be more developmental, the Leaning and Performance Quarterly would like to offer more in-person and online workshops on researching, writing, editing, reviewing, and publishing. It was great to see representation from other departments and disciplines across campus the other evening. We welcome others to join us for future LPQ Workshops as we consider other topics, including:

  • Managing Your Writing Projects
  • Forming Agraphia (Writing) Groups
  • Writing Literature Reviews
  • Drafting Conceptual Articles
  • Secondary Data Analysis

If you have any topic suggestions or would be interested in participating – let me know. Feel free to write suggestions in the comments OR send a message to the LPQ Editors: LPQuarterly [at] gmail [dot] com.

FYI: The NEXT Call for Submissions is on Monday, March 11th at 11:59 pm CDT. Do you have your academic manuscript ready? Submit TODAY!

Reference:

Rocco, T.S. & Hatcher, T. (2011). The handbook of scholarly writing and publishing. San Francisco: Wiley/Jossey-Bass.

LPQ

Published: Learning and Performance Quarterly 1 (4)

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) Volume 1, Issue 4 is hot off the press!

Editorial Abstract: The Learning Spectrum 

Learning is critical for curriculum design, training development, and educational objectives. Both pedagogy and design inform learning practices for suggested practices and models. In the fourth and final issue for the Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) volume one houses a combination of manuscripts to span the learning spectrum.

LPQ Cover PhotoINVITED ARTICLE

What is Action Learning? Components, Types, Process, Issues, and Research Agendas ~ Yonjoo Cho  
CASE STUDY
Students perceptions of collaborative learning in intermedia and performance arts ~ Kate Sicchio, Grant Bridges  
CONCEPT/THEORY PAPER
Web-based Learning Management System Considerations for Higher Education ~ Chih-Hung Chung, Laura A. Pasquini, Chang E. Koh  
BOOK REVIEW
Book Review: Cases on Formal and Informal E-Learning Environments: Opportunities and Practices ~ Lindsay J. Ritenbaugh, Justin C. Shukas  

Call for Submissions

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (ISSN 2166-3564) is a peer-reviewed, open access journal from the Center for Knowledge Solutions at the University of North Texas. The journal takes a broad look at current developments and research that involves innovative learning, training, human resource development, and performance management across academic and professional disciplines.

We are seeking manuscript submissions for the following categories:

  • Research Articles – Qualitative/Quantitative
  • Concept/Theory Papers
  • Case Studies
  • Book or Media Reviews
  • Invited Articles

 

2013 call for submissions deadlines*:

LPQ 2(1): March 11, 2013 at 11:59 pm CDT

LPQ 2(2): May 20, 2013 at 11:59 pm CDT

LPQ 2(3): August, 2013 at 11:59 pm CDT

LPQ 2(4): October 21, 2013 at 11:59 pm CDT

*Submit your manuscripts ONLINE. Submission to publication turnaround time is 6-8 weeks. For detailed submission guidelines and instructions on how to make a submission please visit Author Guidelines. 
Thanks for reading,

 

Laura A. Pasquini & Dr. Jeff Allen, Founding Editors
Learning and Performance Quarterly
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter @LPQuarterly
Email: LPquarterly@gmail.com

LPQ

Published: Learning and Performance Quarterly 1(3)

The third issue of the Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) speaks to the area of facilitation, teams and mobile support systems. This issue discusses theoretical building blocks for researchers that have a renewed interest in teams and their support. The reemergence of this area of study is important as we move further into the age of social media, personal learning networks and global information exchange. Thank you to our authors, editors, and peer reviewers for their contributions to the Learning and Performance Quarterly, Volume 1, Issue 3.

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) is an online, open access peer-review journal designed to make research available to the public and to support a greater exchange of global knowledge. The call for submissions for 2013 is now open – here are the deadlines for manuscripts for Volume 2:

Submission can be made online through the LP Quarterly website. For detailed submission guidelines and instructions on how to make a submission please visit Author Guidelines.

Happy reading,

Laura A. Pasquini & Dr. Jeff Allen, Founding Editors
Learning and Performance Quarterly
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter @LPQuarterly
Email: LPquarterly@gmail.com

LPQ

CFP: The @LPQuarterly Volume 1, Issue 4 EXTENDED: DUE November 5, 2012

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) is an online, open access peer-review journal designed to make research available to the public and to support a greater exchange of global knowledge. We have recently been invited to publish in the EBSCO research database, and our publication is growing both in author contributions and readership. Articles in support of innovative learning and performance across disciplines from developing and proven scholars are welcome for the last call for 2012 – here is the more information about the call for manuscripts.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:
Learning and Performance Quarterly, Volume 1, Issue 4

The Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) is currently accepting submissions for the second issue. Deadline for submissions is Friday, October 26 at 5 pm CDT. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Monday, November 5, 2012 at 11:59 CDT. Submission of manuscripts can be made online through the LP Quarterly website. For detailed submission guidelines and instructions on how to make a submission please visit Author Guidelines.


TYPES OF MANUSCRIPTS ACCEPTED
Research Articles :
Papers that are concerned with the various approaches to learning and performance impact. These papers should discuss the literature related to the approach employed and include a measure of the learning and performance impact of the approach employed.

Case Studies:
Case studies that highlight a particular learning, training, performance or instructional setting in which learning and performance resources were used to address a particular challenge. They present a discussion of the challenge from current literature, what was done to solve or explore it, and the results of the project. They often offer suggestions for others interested in addressing similar challenges.

Concept/Theory Papers:
Papers that present new concepts or contribute to existing theory for learning and performance. This should offer a discussion of the literature related to the concept/theory along with a discussion of the major issues for future research needed to validate the concept/theory.

Book Reviews:
Book reviews of publications 2011 or later will be accepted to highlight a issues and resources relevant for learning and performance and offer a suggested solution or direction. The position is supported with both a logical argument and a review of the pertinent literature. Preference will be given in the review process to book review essays that comment on two or more related books.  Book review essays should not exceed 3,800 words and should include city, state, publisher, and year of the book’s publication.  An abstract of 150 words or less and keywords are required for book review essays.  Reviews of single books should not exceed 1,900 words.  At the beginning of the text please include title, author, publisher, city, date, and page numbers of the book(s) under review.

CALL FOR LEARNING AND PERFORMANCE QUARTERLY REVIEWERS
Interested in reviewing articles for the LPQ Journal? The LPQ journal is looking for reviewers to conduct peer reviews and evaluations of submissions.
Please identify your reviewing interests, substantive areas of expertise, and preferred research methods when completing the LPQ journal registration online.

We look forward to receiving your submissions. Please pass this post onto other colleagues and researchers who might be interested in publishing, reviewing or editing for the Learning and Performance Quarterly journal.

Thank you,

Laura Pasquini & Dr. Jeff Allen, Founding Editors
Learning and Performance Quarterly
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter @LPQuarterly
Email: LPquarterly@gmail.com

#phdchat, ATPI, Learning Technologies, LPQ, Reflections

LT Forum Interview – About My PhD Experience So Far…

The LT Forum is a place for students, staff and faculty in the Department of Learning Technologies at the University of North Texas to share news, announcements and updates. Here is an interview I did for them over the summer, that I forgot to cross-post here. Thanks to for inviting me to share my thoughts Jenny Wakefield.

« on: June 02, 2012, 01:24:32 PM »

We have many talented doctoral students in The Department of Learning Technologies. Our hope is to be able to interview and showcase these PhD learners here in the LT Forum as each reaches milestones through-out their journey towards their graduation. Reading about other students’ successes may boost that extra energy needed for others to push themselves forward and learning about challenges may help guide others. We also want to spotlight our students so that new learners come join our team and travel with us in the Learning Technologies – a great place to be! [Jenny Wakefield.]Our third interview is with Laura Pasquini, Doctoral Student in the APTI program:

Laura Pasquini – PhD Learner in ATPI

JW: Tell me a little bit about what made you decide to enroll in the ATPI program and pursue a PhD/EdD. (When did you enroll? How long have you been working towards your exam and course completion?)

LP: In looking for a graduate program that suited my scholar-practitioner interests in higher education, I thought that the Department of Learning Technologies at UNT was best suited for my talents and interests. After completing a course in Fall 2009. I decided to join the ATPI program in Spring 2010, as I liked the interdisciplinary approach and learning model that was built into the curriculum. As an ATPI doctoral student approaching completion, I appreciate the ability to study in the field of applied technology, human resource management, organizational change/theory, and educational research while connecting with faculty and leaders in the field. The end of 2012 marks the end of my course work and movement into being a PhD candidate. I am fortunate to be one of the first ATPI doctoral students to complete the NEW ATPI portfolio (instead of the comprehensive exam) by November, and after my last ATTD class with Dr. Nimon this Fall I will be ready to propose my doctoral dissertation and move on to being a doctoral candidate. The tentative plan is to be complete the ATPI doctoral program and graduate around May 2014.

JW: Who is your major professor?

LP: Dr. Jeff Allen is my major professor. It has been great collaborating and learning from one another. I appreciate the ability to work with and contribute to research, publications, and opportunities in the LT department. He has been a great faculty advisor who knows how to challenge and support my professional/academic needs.

JW: What has been the most challenging parts of your studies so far?

LP: Balance. I am a student, staff, and instructor at the University of North Texas. My role as an Academic Counselor/Instructor with the Office for Exploring Majors, Undergraduate Studies supports undecided students with their major/career choices and academic journey; whereas I am often found on campus, late in class, or researching/writing for another project. Besides working on courses, I have found great values in collaborating with other authors on publications, connecting in the field with other educators, and meeting corporate leaders. Besides working on courses, I have been busy with contributing to professional associations and journals with research, publications, and presentations. This year I have taken on the role as the editor for the Learning and Performance Quarterly (LPQ) which is a student-led, blind peer-review open-access online journal. We just published our first issue on May 22, 2012 and I’m looking forward to working with our reviewers and editors on the second issue over the summer.

JW: Tell us a little bit about your journey so far. What are challenges you’ve had to overcome? Have you had any pleasant surprises, aha-moments you’d like to share?

LP: I am originally from Toronto/Niagara Falls, Canada, so it took me a little while to adjust to the climate and the ways of Texas. I have been fortunate to meet some hospitable friends and colleagues who have helped my transition to the Lone Star state. So far I have really enjoyed my PhD journey. I have appreciated the projects, classes, discussions, and, most importantly, the connections with peers from UNT and in the learning technology field. I think that learning is an ongoing process, and developing as a researcher and academic is a continual experience. I have learned to celebrate the accomplishments and milestones along the way, and to be open to any feedback and new ideas I am exposed to along the way.

JW: What presentations have you attended/presented at? Tell us a little bit about one of them. Anything in particular that comes to mind? Advice for others?

LP: I have been fortunate to present research, papers, and theoretical sessions at a variety of professional associations and conferences over the last few years. Some have been collaborative and others have been a great learning experience where I have engaged with participants in meaningful discussions about shared research experiences.

LP: Over the last year I have been fortunate to be asked to share ideas and thoughts around connected learning and social practices for professionals as an invited speaker a few conferences/meetings. Last fall I was invited to talk to the University of Hawaii System Advising group at their annual workshop in Honolulu, HI about “Why Advising Networks Matter” and how holistic, community models of connected advising practices best support our learners. I just returned from Helena, MT where I was invited to be the opening keynote speaker for the Mountain MoodleMoot. During this talk I shared strategies for developing learning curriculum and ideas to support social learning with Digital Pedagogy to Engage. Both talks offered me opportunities to share my research ideas and practical experiences with social, connected learning; but more importantly it allowed me to connect with colleagues to discuss how these ideas can be applied to provide solutions for issues in education.

JW: What publications and/or creative works have you published?

LP: In collaborating with a few authors from our campus and other locations in the US, I have experience publishing book chapters, monograph chapters, and conference proceedings around topics in technology for advising, collaborative learning, and innovative practices for performance and learning. I am currently working on a few manuscripts for peer-reviewed journals. If you want to see my publications, I have current publications shared on my Mendeley account. Besides formal publications, I am often reflecting and sharing thoughts about my research on my blog or podcasting with the BreakDrink.com Student Affairs and Higher Education community on the Campus Technology Connection podcast.

JW: Have you decided on your dissertation topic and if so what was it? If so, what made you decide on this topic?

LP: I am currently culling through my literature review and narrowing my dissertation topic – which should be finalized over the break in coursework this summer. My current research thread and interests are in the areas of collaborative learning environments and personal learning networks, specifically how these networks and environments impact learning, training, and development in organizations. What interested me in these topics was personal experience connecting and learning in both formal and informal learning networks – specifically with peer-to-peer learning and mentoring in professional organizations. I hope to share some insights and values to how alternative forms of learning, training, and mentoring can impact professional development and career growth.

JW: Have you been studying full-time or also been working? How do you feel about combining PhD studies and working full-time (if you did)? What are things to potentially keep in mind?

LP: As I shared above, I have been working full-time as well as working on my doctoral studies, research, and publications. I will say that it is quite busy and challenging; however with some effective time management and organization it is not impossible to accomplish your academic goals. I am grateful to have supportive peers, colleagues, faculty, and family who continue to motivate and push me along my PhD journey. Although it is not impossible, I will say that it takes a great amount of energy, effort, and time to commit to doctoral research and academic professional development.

JW: Any recommendations you would like to share with the rest of us on the journey towards a PhD/Ed.D? 

LP: Stay the course. It seems like a long journey to the end of the PhD/Ed.D, but I think that there are some valuable experiences and rewards along the way. Embrace the challenges and opportunities that you have as a doctoral student beyond the course/program requirements. You can help shape your degree and academic experience, so be sure to make the most of it by getting involved, getting connected, and embrace new learning experiences that you stumble upon along the way.

JW: Anything else you would like to add?

LP: Thanks for asking me to share my thoughts about the Learning Technologies department and ATPI doctoral program. For those of you who want to follow along my PhD journey, I can often be found tweeting or reflecting on my blog. Get connected and share your experiences with me: http://about.me/laurapasquini