#HEdigID

#HEdigID Chat No. 9: Digital Storytelling in Higher Ed

Telling stories is what makes us human. Homo sapiens have been telling and sharing stories for a long, long time. We love to hear a good tale. Think about the last time you read (books, poems, articles, etc.), watched (e.g. TV, film, documentary, or video game), and heard (e.g. radio, podcast, family member, etc.) a REALLY good story. I’m sure you’re thinking about a story right now and it is making you smile. That’s the art and craft of telling a good narrative.

I have been interested in how we are telling our digital tales and our stories within higher ed for quite some time. Whether it’s creating explainer videos about scholarship with, Research Shorts, bantering with Jeff on BreakDrink, sharing thoughts and experiences on my blog, or interviewing a colleagues on the #InVinoFab podcast — I have learned so much from peer narratives and personal reflections offered online. Integrating digital storytelling into the work we do in higher ed — as staff, faculty or graduate students — requires the application of technology to narrative skill development.

What is digital storytelling? As Bryan Alexander (2017) says: “Simply put, it is telling stories with digital technologies. Digital stores are narratives built from the stuff of cyberculture.” That is, the places where we share photographs, podcasts, virtual reality environments, blogs, video clips, games, novels, writing, Facebook Groups, Twitter chat archives, and more! It may combine the oral tradition of storytelling with visual and sound OR more of new media spaces. Additionally, there are ways to interact, engage, and offer a diverse point of views and opinions on these digital tales. This craft has the ability to unpack narratives and communicate ideas on a topic while taking the the audiences perspective into consideration.

Higher ed professionals could do better at encouraging reflection and meaning making by sharing our own tales of experience. The higher education landscape needs more authentic learning experiences and thoughtful skill development with critical digital pedagogical practices (Alexander, Adams Becker, Cummins, & Hall Giesinger, 2017; Alexander, 2017). How does “digital storytelling” impact career success? How do we apply information literacy or digital fluency our daily work? How are we modelling digital storytelling to the learners we work with? The 2017 NMC Digital Literacy Impact Study (Adams Becker, Pasquini, & Zenter, 2017) revealed that digital storytelling concepts and capabilities were rarely employed in education, and there is a skill-gap in digital with regards to both scholarship dissemination and occupational success. We see more critical thinking and research online, rather than digital creation, making, and production. I think we can do better — it’s time to find our storytelling voice, higher ed! The time to share your story is NOW!

With the proliferation of web-based, mobile, and emerging technologies (e.g. streaming websites, digital/video/audio media, etc.) higher ed professionals have the potential to move from lurking and commenting to making and creating space to lead the conversation. There needs to be more digital making by professionals to model effective digital storytelling. By leveraging technologies and new media, more colleagues (I hope) will have have the ability to share personal stories, document individual experiences and find deeper meaning in our lived professional experiences as we archive these online. There is no one way to tell a story in this evolving landscape — this might be sharing stories through audio, video, text, and visual mediums.  That being said, we have to be fearless enough to SPEAK UP and SHARE OUR STORY as this counts in the professional work we do at our colleges and universities. By working out loud and contributing to digital storytelling, we are able to process knowledge, employ innovative ideas, and disseminate our own initiatives within and beyond higher ed.

For the next Higher Ed Digital Identity (#HEdigID) SLOW (all-day) chat we will discuss what it means to tell our OWN narratives as professionals in higher ed. Join the conversation asynchronously via the hashtag: #HEdigID and/or contribute to this OPEN Google doc of questions: http://bit.ly/hedigid9

Learn more about the #HEdigID Chat and review the QUESTIONS in that will be posted on Twitter and in the Google doc for this ALL DAY discussion on FRIDAY, October 12, 2018:

  1. Is there a story from #highered that resonates with you the most? This could be an article, new piece, book, or personal tale. Please share!
  2. What stories do you think #highered and those outside our colleges/universities should HEAR? What digital stories should WE be telling about the academy?
  3. Who might be your audience for your digital stories about #highered? Tell us about WHO might LISTEN or be interested in your story?
  4. Are you a digital storyteller in #highered (new or experienced) or do you know one? If so, please share where YOU or OTHERS share their narratives online to read, watch, or listen.
  5. If you are just getting started in digital storytelling, what questions, concerns or considerations do you have about telling your own or other narratives in #highered? Tell us about it!
  6. What digital storytelling spaces and places give YOU inspiration about telling your own narrative? Share your STORYTELLING muses, motives, and resources here.

Join TODAY’s (October 12th) discussion on Digital Storytelling in Higher Ed:

  • Tweet your response with the hashtag: #HEdigID

  • Share your answer IN this Google Doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid9

  • Use these questions to draft your own reflection OR response (e.g. blog, video, audio, drawing or discussion)

References:

Adams Becker, S., Pasquini, L. A., & Zentner, A. (2017). 2017 Digital literacy impact study: An NMC horizon project strategic brief. Volume 3.5, November 2017. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

Alexander, B. (2017). The new digital Sstorytelling: Creating narratives with new media–Revised and Updated Edition. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Alexander, B., Becker, S. A., Cummins, M., & Giesinger, C. H. (2017). Digital literacy in higher education, Part II: An NMC Horizon project strategic brief (pp. 1-37). The New Media Consortium.
#HEdigID

#HEdigID Chat No. 8: #SocialMediaLife These Days

Love it or hate it, social media is a part of our daily lives. It’s not a trend or fad that is going away. Social media is deeply embedded into our every day activities, how we communicate, how many find news and information, and it supports our relationships near and far. Almost everyone, young and old, are now active in various social media platforms due to the tethering there is to portable smart devices (phones, tablets, watches, and more) and increased access and availability to the Internet (WiFi, 4G, etc.).  After listening to the recent @mozilla IRL Podcast episode “Kids These Days” with Veronica Belmont, Manoush Zomorodi, and Alexandra Samuel, I was concerned about if the “kids” were alright — that is the teens AND adults who have report daily social media.

The two 2018 reports from the US are interesting to compare how we are thinking about our #SocialMediaLife whether we are young or old:

 

Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences (2018)via @CommonSense Media (n=1,141)

  • 89% of teens with a smartphone (ages 13-17)
  • 70% of teens who use social media multiple times a day
  • Snapchat (41%), Instagram (22%), and Facebook (15%) are the social media sites these teens use the most
  • 72% of teens believe that tech companies manipulate users to spend more time on their devices

Social Media Use in 2018 Report* via @PewResearch (n=2,002)

  • YouTube (73%), Facebook (68%), Instagram (35%), Pinterest (29%), Snapchat (27%), LinkedIn (25%), Twitter (24%), and Whatsapp (22%) of US adults say they use social media online or on their cellphone
  • A majority of adults visit Facebook (51%), Snapchat (49%), Instagram (38%), Twitter (26%), and YouTube (29%) on a daily basis

*That being said, I’m curious what the future report of adult social media use will be after learning about Facebook data scraping at congressional hearings, recent visits to congress by Twitter and Facebook, and questions if we should break up with these social media platform monopolies (e.g. Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp). I suspect much has changed since this report was released in March 2018.

Much of the recent #SocialMediaLife of Teens shared in the recent Common Sense study is reflecting what I am learning about adults on these platforms as well. As Veronica said, “Teens. They’re just like us!” There is a growing concern about behaviors, practices, and social interactions among my peers who need role models and mentoring just as much as the youth. There are similar patterns and concerns about #SocialMediaLife I am learning about from higher ed professionals (faculty and staff), my adult learners (online and face-to-face students) and among my peers (friends, family, colleagues, etc.). There is no shortage of emotions, thoughts, reflections, and reactions to how we are now thinking about social media in our lives. Let’s unpack this recent report about teens to see how much different we actually feel about these social platforms in our day-to-day life. Join me for the open, online conversation, won’t you?

#HEdigID CHAT TOPIC: #SocialMediaLife These Days

The next Higher Ed Digital Identity SLOW chat will be on Twitter with the hashtag: #HEdigID and #SocialMediaLife paired with this OPEN Google doc of questions: http://bit.ly/hedigid8

Learn more about the #HEdigID Chat and review the QUESTIONS in that will be posted on Twitter and in the Google doc the discussion ALL DAY on FRIDAY, September 14, 2018:

  1. What is your preferences for communication with family/friends? VOTE NOW HERE: Twitter Poll
  2. Related to #HEdigID Q1: Has using #socialmedia and your devices changed the way you communicate with friends, family, colleagues, etc.? Please share how your #SocialMediaLife or how technology has shaped the ways you interact and communicate with others.
  3. The @PewResearch report from March 2018 found that a majority of adults visit Facebook (51%), Snapchat (49%), Instagram (38%), Twitter (26%), and YouTube (29%) on a daily basis. Is this true for YOUR own practice? Please share your thoughts/use on these platforms now.
    • VOTE: Identify the ONE social media platform you use the MOST on a daily basis {Twitter Poll to be added}
  4. In looking at the @CommonSense #SocialMediaLife of Teens Study 2018 [https://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/social-media-social-life-2018], was there anything that stood out in this report that YOU want to talk about today? [Developing questions and prompts for the #HEdigID chat for later].
  5. “72% of teens believe that tech companies manipulate users to spend more time on their devices” @CommonSense What is your perspective on how your devices and these #socialmedia platforms strive to get your attention? How do you deal with this distraction? #socialmedialife
  6. “Teens are much more likely to say #socialmedia has a positive rather than a negative effect on how they feel (e.g. less lonely, depressed, anxious and more confidence, popular, etc.)” @CommonSense Does this resonate with YOUR feelings about your #SocialMediaLife? Please share.
  7. #HEdigID QUESTIONS & OPEN CHAT: To be determined (see question no. 4 and respond!)…

Join the discussion on #SocialMediaLife today:

  • Tweeting your response with the hashtag: #HEdigID

  • Answer IN this Google Doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid8

  • Use these questions to draft your own reflection OR response (e.g. blog, video, audio, drawing or discussion)

 

Update: Transcript from this #HEdigID chat can be found HERE

#HEdigID

#HEdigID Chat No. 7: Managing Digital Overload & Stress

It’s August, which means the start of Fall college/university semester is just around the corner. I’m not entirely sure if I am ready for summer to be over; however, I do know that one of my own goals before school begins was to make sure my digital life was in order and ready. Fortunately, the August Higher Ed Digital Identity (#HEdigID) Chat welcomes Paul Eaton (@profpeaton) as the guest moderator (MOD) for Friday’s (8/10) #HEdigID chat slow, all-day Twitter chat. Thanks to all who participated in the discussion last month. There was an active conversation over a few days for the #HEDigID no. 6 on Open Ed Practices in July, and a thoughtful and kind reflection from contributors/lurkers.

To reflect on our digital lives, Paul has prepared questions and prompts to encourage us to think about how to better manage our networked practices before it manages us. Here is more about the August #HEdigID chat topic, Managing Digital Overload & Stress:

Digital tools, platforms, applications, and hardware are often heralded for their ability to connect professionals, openly share resources and knowledge, and build communities of practice across geographic spaces.

Digital tools and social media spaces have ushered in new stressors for professionals in higher education.” ~ Paul Eaton

Some of these we know about anecdotally – the fear of missing out, the hidden expectation of constant connectivity, comparative stress such as imposter syndrome, or stress from online conflict. Other stresses of the digital age we may be less cognizant of – for example, bodily stress induced by consistent eye strain, sitting or typing on digital devices. There may even be good stress, as in the recent article from Meier (2018) on how the comparison can drive us to perform better.  The purpose of this month’s #HEdigID chat will be to examine the many ways digital tools, spaces, and places, contribute to stress in our lives (both good and bad), and how can we manage that stress effectively as professionals.

Reference:

Meier, A., & Schafer, S. (2018). The positive side of social comparison on social network sites: How envy can drive inspiration on Instagram. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 21(7). https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2017.0708

#HEdigID CHAT TOPIC: Managing Digital Overload & Stress

The next Higher Ed Digital Identity SLOW chat will be on Twitter with the hashtag: #HEdigID and within this OPEN Google doc: http://bit.ly/HEdigid7

Learn more about the #HEdigID Chat and review the QUESTIONS in that will be posted on Twitter and in the Google doc the next discussion on FRIDAY (August 10th):

  1. Today we are talking about Managing Digital Overload and Stress. Tell us who you are, what you do, and what brings you to the discussion?
  2. This is a big topic. What are some issues, questions, and concerns you would like to address around the topic of “Managing Digital Overload and Stress”?
  3. How do you define digital overload? In what ways does a digital overload manifest in your professional and/or personal life?
  4. How do you define digital stress? What are some ways or symptoms you feel that technologies and your online life impact your stress levels?
  5. Not all digital stress is bad – so how does being connected and online motivate the work you do in #highered?
  6. Let’s talk about managing your digital life and work. What are some strategies and practices have you implemented to deal with digital overload and stress?
  7. Let’s talk about tools for your digital life and work. What are some tools or resources you use to manage your digital life?

Join the discussion on managing your digital life by:

  • Tweeting your response with the hashtag: #HEdigID

  • Responding directly IN this Google Doc: http://bit.ly/HEdigid7 {the “HE” is capitalized}

  • Use these questions to draft your own personal reflection and response (e.g. blog post, video, audio, drawing or offline discussion)

Update: Transcripts from the #HEdigID chat from August 8th are HERE

#AcDigID, #EdDigID, #HEdigID, Research

HOW TO: Set Up Your ORCID

ORCID Logo image c/o the Wikimedia Commons

What Is an ORCID? https://orcid.org/

An ORCID is a unique 16 digit ID for researchers, academics, and scholars. The ability to set up an ORCID personal account is that it allows you to attach a specific digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other scholar, and it is free! I encourage most collaborators I research and write with to set up their own account, as this persistent digital ID is often used as an integration tool for a number of journals and grant applications. Plus it’s often used as to sign in to complete some academic conference proceedings and/or to peer review manuscripts for journals. Additionally, other key research protocols integrated into digital portals for scholarly work may also require an ORCID. Additionally, an ORCID account allows you to aggregate other digital professional activities or networks (e.g. ResearcherID, LinkedIn, etc.) and scholarly outputs into one online space to ensure your work is recognized and credited to you!

ORCID around the world from ORCID on Vimeo.

Having an ORCID will help:

  • Allows your work to be discoverable by others.
  • Provides a means to distinguish between you and other authors with identical or similar names.
  • Links together all of your works even if you have used different names over the course of your career.
  • Makes it easy for you & others to connect to research outputs (e.g. journal log in, grant funders, etc.)
  • Ensures that your work is clearly attributed to you.
  • Helps minimize repetitive data entering – when submitting manuscripts for publication or applications for grants – systems using ORCID will help pre-populate your contact details/information.

Where are ORCID in Use? 

  • By publishers in manuscript submission and data repositories.
  • By some professional societies to manage membership, authorship, and conferences.
  • By some funding agencies (e.g. NIH or SciENcv) to generate the required bio sketch.
  • By some metrics tools, such as Impactstory.org.  Add ORCID to you Impact Story profile to import your citation information – and view to see altmetrics displayed for your publications.
  • By researcher profile tools (e.g. ResearchGate, Mendeley, etc.).


SET UP YOUR ORCID:

  1. Start by Registering for an ORCID iD here: https://orcid.org/register
  2. If you have any questions or issues with this setup, be sure to visit the Create an iD: Website User site: http://support.orcid.org/knowledgebase/articles/171598-create-an-id-website-user

Here is a “how to” Video for ORCID registration c/o the Research Medical Library: 

#HEdigID, Open Education

#HEdigID Chat No. 6: Open Educational Practices with @SuzanKoseoglu #OEP #OER #OpenEd

It’s almost Friday, July 13th, which means it’s time to get ready for the monthly Higher Ed Digital Identity (#HEdigID) Chat! I am excited to expand the #HEdigID conversation to welcome Suzan Koseoglu (@SuzanKoseoglu) as a guest moderator (MOD) for this slow Twitter chat. In preparing for the #hedigid MOD -ing role, Suzan has developed a list of questions and prompts to facilitate this ALL DAY discussion on Open Educational Practices (#OEP) she details further:

There has been growing interest in digital Open Educational Practices (OEPs) in recent years as evidenced in the increasing number of research papers, reports and conference presentations on the topic and in the discourse on open practice in general. Although OEPs are mostly discussed in the context of OERs, mostly in terms of OER creation, adoption and use, it is actually a multidimensional construct which encompasses many different dimensions of open approaches and practices. These may include open scholarship, open learning, open teaching/pedagogy, open systems and architectures, and open source software.

“A focus on open practice is important because it shifts the focus of open educational initiatives and efforts from access to process: the process of learning, teaching, designing.” ~ Suzan Koseoglu

The process of co-construction, active and meaningful engagement. It is also a call to think deeply and critically about openness, a call for a deeper investigation into the relationship between technology and education, and the complex interaction between educational resources, methods of teaching, the institutional culture and available support mechanisms

To prepare for this conversation around open ed practices, here is a bit more information to review before the upcoming #HEdigID Chat:

#HEdigID Chat TOPIC: Open Educational Practices (#OEP)

This SLOW chat can be found on Twitter with the hashtag: #HEdigID and within this OPEN Google doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid6

Here are the QUESTIONS you will see appear on Twitter and in an open Google doc for the FRIDAY (July 13th) #HEdigID ALL-DAY discussion:

  1. Today we are talking about open educational practices (OEP). What questions or issues do you want to discuss related to this topic?
  2. What is open educational practice for you? How would you define it?
  3. Let’s build a thematic timeline of open practice collectively! When did you first engage in an open practice and why? – We’ll share the results soon at #HEdigID after the Twitter chat.
  4. TWITTER POLL:  Higher Education institutions recognize and reward open scholarship (e.g., OA publishing, open teaching, open sharing, networked learning) as a valid form of academic scholarship.  [VOTE: (a) I agree; (b) I don’t agree; or (c) I don’t know]
  5. How do open educational practices (OEPs) impact your digital identity?
  6. TBD based on responses to Q1

Join the discussion on open educational practices by:

  • Tweeting your response with the hashtag: #HEdigID

  • Responding directly IN this Google Doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid6

  • Use these questions to draft your own personal reflection and response (e.g. blog post, video, audio, drawing or offline discussion)

 

UPDATE: July 14, 2018 to include the Twitter chat transcript:

#HEdigID Chat Transcript, No. 6: Open Educational Resources #OEP (July 13, 2018)

#AcWri, #AcWriMo, #AcWriSummer, #HEdigID, Higher Education, highered

#HEdigID Chat No. 5: Renew, Refresh, Reboot, Restart Your Academic Writing with Janet Salmons (@einterview) #AcWri

Hello Summer! This year, I am committing to my own projects, design, developments, and ACADEMIC WRITING (#AcWri)! That’s right. I’ve opted to NOT instruct any courses during the summer term. This is a first since I started my faculty career (Fall 2014). This is also an intentional choice. Things are building up and projects need to be completed. I decided this summer will be dedicated to completing ALL THE THINGS! This includes research projects in-progress (data collection, cleaning, coding, and analysis) and getting these to the right publication outlets and avenues.

So based on these goals and writing objectives, I’m thrilled to kick off this summer with a timely Higher Ed Digital Identity (#HEdigID) Chat:

#HEdigID Chat TOPIC: Renew, Refresh, Reboot, Restart Your Academic Writing

This Friday, June 8th the #HEdigID chat will be moderated (MOD) by Janet Salmons (@einterview) to sort out these forgotten or neglected academic writing (#AcWri) projects. This ALL DAY conversation will be hosted on Twitter with the hashtag: #HEdigID and via this OPEN Google doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid5

Do you have goals to get working on a writing project this summer? Are you changing your career goals, and this requires getting a few publications out the door? OR, if you have a writing project you’ve pushed to the side or you have neglected — then this #HEdigID chat is FOR YOU (and me).

“Academic writing includes more moving parts than other types, meaning we have more excuses for setting aside an unfinished piece of work.” ~ Janet Salmons

With a number of things to consider (e.g. updates to your literature review, methods for analysis, or even outlets to publish), you might just need this #HEdigID chat to get you to return to your own writing piece. Whether you are feeling excited or overwhelmed with your own academic writing, come join the online discussion to share what YOU hope to accomplish for your summer writing goals.

Here are the QUESTIONS you will see appear on Twitter and in the Google doc for your responses TODAY (June 8th) for this #HEdigID ALL-DAY digital chat:

  1. Please introduce yourself. Feel free to include: Where are you located? Where you work and/or your role? What you’re writing and working on these days? AND/OR Tell us your favorite place to write! #AcWri #AcWriChat
  2. Tell us about a writing project that you have left behind, let go, or let die. How long ago? What got in the way or prevented you from finishing this #AcWri project?
  3. Describe what kind of writing project are you trying to revive. What is this #AcWri project? Thesis/dissertation? Article? Chapter or book? Report or other professional writing? Please share!
  4. Is it time to revive this writing project? Reflect on your #AcWri purpose, in the context of your goals, do they match? E.g. Should this journal article now be a white paper report and/or blog post? Have you thought differently about a book chapter or book idea format?
  5. Let’s talk about updating this writing project: Is your literature review AND/OR your data out of date? What writing tasks, obstacles, and research will you need to work on to UPDATE this #AcWri piece?
  6. Does your writing PRACTICE or TOOLS need some updating to help you be productive with your project? What areas of writing practice support do you need? What #AcWri suggestions do you have for writers to be effective with their writing process?How will you commit to rebooting this academic writing project? What strategies and ideas do you have to be accountable to this #AcWri plan? Please share SUGGESTIONS and IDEAS for staying on track with this writing project revival!
  7. Final Thought (FT): What is one new SPARK or REASON you are inspired you to return to this academic writing project? What will drive you to prioritize this #AcWri project and commit to finishing it this time?

Converse with us? Join in discuss these questions and more! How to participate:

  • Tweet your response with the hashtag: #HEdigID

  • Share more in this Google Doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid5

  • Use these questions to draft your own personal reflection and response (e.g. blog post, video, audio, drawing or offline discussion)

  • Lurk and learn!

 

Update June 12, 2018:

ARCHIVE of the Tweets from this #HEdigID Chat

Follow-up blog post from the #HEdigID MOD, @einterivew: Keeping Writing Projects Alive

#AcDigID, #EdDigID, #HEdigID

#HEdigID Chat No. 4: Digital Opportunities & Networked Challenges

So… as I said in my early post this week, being a higher ed professional online is complicated:

With the shift and scale of a number of social networks and online platforms, I’m not so sure everyone needs to be everywhere online. Some might need an academic persona … whereas other college/university staff may not or might be struggling with their digital, professional lives. Being a higher ed professional online is quite complicated. Asking and learning about professionals digital selves unpacks the complexity of living our individual networked experiences. Being a digital professional might differ based on the culture of the institution, support (or lack there of) from peers and/or a supervisor, ability to participate (or not) based on geographic location, and the social identities that travel with professionals via online platforms. The decision to “be” a professional online is not a simple or straightforward “how to” guide. And, I think it’s something that often gets overlooked or not really talked about it among higher ed faculty and staff — so let’s change that. Let’s talk about it!

And talk we WILL, during the 4th monthly Higher Ed Digital Identity Chat on Friday, May 18, 2018!

#HEdigID Chat TOPIC: “Digital Opportunities & Networked Challenges ”

Here are few QUESTIONS that will roll out on Twitter throughout TODAY and are posted in the open Google doc for the #HEdigID Friday (May 18th) ALL-DAY digital conversation. In previous #HEdigID conversations we have talked about the affordances and challenges, but we have not touched upon our own personal data and privacy after we agree to an app or platforms terms of service. We need to discuss ways to support staff, faculty, and students using social media in higher ed, specifically in asking:

  1. What digital platforms and social networks are you “present” and/or do you participate on (besides Twitter) as a #highered professional (staff/faculty)?
  2. Describe WHY you are digitally active, have a digital identity/persona, and engage in a peer network/community online as a #highered professional (faculty/staff).
  3. What online communities or networked spaces do you flock to for your professional learning & development, discipline engagement, research sharing, or open practice? E.g. hashtags, groups, podcasts, blogs, etc.
  4. What are the benefits of developing a digital identity or being present online in a digital #highered community? Tell us what you have gained from being connected & networked for your role in higher ed.
  5. How much TIME do you spend each day/week on digital and social platforms to engage with peers, share in a community, or “be” online? What strategies, tips or tricks do you suggest to manage social media & flow of information on digital platforms to cut through the noise/clutter online?
  6. What challenges and/or risks exist for networked #highered professionals (staff/faculty) who are active in online communities or engage on digital platforms? Have you ever left a social network or digital platform due to any challenges/risks online?
  7. What suggestions or resources do you have for #highered professionals (faculty/staff) who are concerned about protecting their data and personal information online?

What questions, issues, or challenges should we be discussing with our peers in networked spaces? How are we thinking about the opportunities and the risks for being connected online as a higher education professional (faculty/staff)? What’s the GOOD and BAD about participating in an online community of practice?

The questions are posted and shared NOW and this day-long Twitter chat will conclude late afternoon on Friday (5/18)in my timezone (Central Standard Time). This SLOW style Twitter chat is designed to allow more higher ed colleagues and friends to join in the conversation to account for different geographic regions, multiple time zones, busy schedules, and more

Join us on Friday, May 18, 2018 to discuss these questions and more! You can participate by:

  • Tweeting a response using this hashtag on Twitter: #HEdigID

  • Draft a longer response in the open OPEN Google Doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid4

  • Take any (or all) of these questions to create your OWN response in any media or format, you want: journal, blog post, video/audio reflection, drawing, or offline discussion. 🙂

I welcome and would love to hear YOUR suggestions. What QUESTIONS or ISSUES should we consider for this chat? Please share in the Google doc above or comments below. I’m looking forward to the conversation and contribution in Twitter and in the Google doc. Additionally, do you care to moderate a FUTURE #HEdigID chat? Guest moderators ARE INVITED! Learn more here: https://techknowtools.com/twitter-chats/hedigid/