#AcWri, #AcWriMo, #AcWriSummer

#AcWriSummer: Week 2 – Abstract Writing & Selecting a Journal

Last week, I shared how we were setting up an #AcWriSummer accountability group. Well, it happened. Thanks to Patrice, Catherine, & Caroline who are joining me on this 8-week #AcWri adventure as we go through the workbook created by Wendy Laura Belcher: Writing Your Journal Article in 12 Weeks. Also, much thanks to Wendy, who shared her syllabi, as we work through our “short course” this summer. Here’s what our #AcWriSummer 2016 Plan looks like for the next few weeks:

  • 6th June WEEK 1: Chapter 1: Designing your plan for writing => Ideas for article; barriers; planning this short course
  • 13th June WEEK 2: Chapter 2 & 4: Abstract writing & Selecting a Journal
  • 20th June WEEK 3: Chapter 5: Reviewing the literature => (Reflections on) Lit review
  • 27th June WEEK 4: Chapter 3 & 6: Advancing argument & Strengthen structure => Article outline
  • 4th July WEEK 5: Chapter 7 & 8:Presenting evidence & Opening/Concluding => Draft article
  • 11th July WEEK 6: Chapter 9 & 10: Give/get/use feedback & Edit sentences => Give feedback on manuscripts
  • 18th July WEEK 7: Chap 11 & 12 (Wrapping up & Sending article!) => Final article
  • 25th July WEEK 8: X & Other (wrap up)

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Items we’ll be working on this week are from Chapter (or Week) 2 and 4, which includes creating an abstract and reviewing potential journal publication outlets. We will be discussing these items on Friday (6/17) morning from 9-10 am CT (see more details about our online, synchronous meetings at the end of this post).

Week 2: Starting Your Article: The Abstract

“One of the best ways to get started on a revision of your journal article is to write and abstract – something that describes your article’s topics and argument” (Belcher, 2009, p. 54).

Why is writing an abstract so important?

  • Solving problems – can you clarify your own writing for what your manuscript is about? If not you might need more focus.
  • Connecting with editors (potential journal outlets) – are you able to explain your manuscript to a potential editor to determine fit with a journal?
  • Getting found – Can you explain and outline your research so it is easily found by other scholars? Think beyond title – abstract, keywords, etc.
  • Getting read – Can you introduce your article well enough that scholars will download and read your full article?
  • Getting cited – Would scholars be able to cite you on reading only your abstract? Do you share what the research is about in a succinct way?

The ‘Ingredients of a Good Abstract: Social Science” as suggested by Belcher (2009, p. 55) would answer the following questions:

  • Why did you start this research/project? (gap in literature, debate, or social issue?)
  • What is the project/research about? (topic of the article)
  • How did you conduct the research? (methodology)
  • What are your findings?  
  • What conclusions are formed from the study? (your argument)
  • What are your recommendations? (optional)

 

Chapter 4: Selecting a Journal: Searching & Evaluating

We bumped up Chapter (Week) 4 to this week, as we think it is important to also have an idea of how to formulate your manuscript based on the publication outlet you are aiming for. In this section of the workbook, Belcher offers a number of questions and resources to consider when searching and evaluating journal outlets.

If you have not already spoken to your advisor, colleagues, or peers about potential journal outlets in your discipline or for your research — you should! NOW! We will be discussing our target journals we have searched and evaluated during this week’s #AcWriSummer meeting. Other suggestions from Belcher (2009) include an old-fashioned shelf/online search, reviewing your citations to see where this research was published, identifying where your discipline publishes through your professional/academic associations and searching journal/electronic databases.

Here are a few search resources for finding journal outlets for publishing:

Let us know if you have other suggestions for searching for journals that you like or use – thanks!

Evaluating Academic Journals

Belcher (2009) offers questions to ask as you review these journal options for your own manuscript. I might suggest keeping the above journal and/or database information available AND be sure to DOWNLOAD the Scopus List [in Excel format] as it will also answer these questions when reviewing potential journals:

    • Is the journal peer reviewed?
    • Is the journal in the recommend publishing outlet category?
    • Does the journal have a solid reputation?
    • Does the journal have a reputable publisher?
    • Has the journal been around for a while?
    • Is the journal carefully produced?
    • Does the journal come out on time?
    • Are the authors published in its pages diverse?
    • Does the journal publish more than 5 or 6 articles a year?
    • Is the journal online or indexed electronically and where?
    • Does it take a long time to get published once you submit your manuscript?
    • Is the journal going through a transition?
    • Who reads the journal?
    • Does the journal have an upcoming theme or special issue on your topic?
    • Does the journal have word or page length limits you can meet?
    • Does the style of your article match the journal’s style?
    • Do you know any of the journal’s editors?
    • How does the journal require articles be submitted?

It was great to learn that Wendy is currently updating her book to include the importance of READING relevant journal articles. In listening to the 1st Episode of Research in Action, Wendy shared how more writers should be reading relevant journals. This is true. If you are not reading at least one article a week (or more), then you are not supporting your academic writing craft. Reading relevant journal articles, specifically those in a journal where you would like to target your manuscript allow you to target your paper by:

  • Citing related articles from the journal you select
  • Finding a model article to outline your manuscript to follow preferred style/format
  • Reading and knowing the direction, focus, scope, etc. of the journal
  • Determining articles published in the journal relevant to your topic, methods, etc.
  • Identifying the length of the articles and the number of references
  • Outlining key components in accepted articles published in that journal outlet 

This is not ALL there is in these workbook chapters for Week’s 2 and 4; however I thought a few of these resources might be helpful if you need to prepare your own abstract and you invested in locating the appropriate academic journal outlet for your manuscript.

Interested in Joining Us for our #AcWriSummer 2016 short course? Here are a few things to get involved in our academic writing group:

  1.  COMMIT to the #acwri process EVERY WEEK. This means following the workbook curriculum, check in during our weekly meetings, and following through with goals and objectives set each week for your writing process.
  2. SHARE YOUR PROGRESS via the #AcWriSummer 2016 Accountability Spreadsheet
  3. MEET EACH FRIDAY  (in June and July) from 9-10 am CT via the GoToMeeting link to “check in” and work through the chapter(s) each week:
  • #AcWri Summer Accountability Group 2016
  • Join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/648338213
  • You can also dial in using your phone: United States +1 (408) 650-3123; Access Code: 648-338-213

Reference:

Belcher, W. L. (2009). Writing your journal article in 12 weeks: A guide to academic publishing success. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc.

Reflections

I’m Back… and #HowISpentMySummer [30-Day Photo Challenge]

You may remember me from blogging back in June. Well based on a certain (EPIC!) summer road trip I was rarely at my computer or connected over the last few weeks… and it was DELIGHTFUL. I enjoyed being able to take a proper holiday & just enjoying the great outdoors.

I would blog about it, but too much fun and adventure has happened in the last 5 weeks to contain in just one blog post. Based on a photo challenge idea prompted byJennifer Joslin (a.k.a. @jenniferejoslin), I’ll be sharing what I was up to over the summer with my #highered & #edtech community using the hashtag, #HowISpentMySummer:

#HowISpentMySummer Photo Challenge 2014

Join us in sharing ONE (1) photo a day to let us know how YOU spent your summer  (feel free to play catch up from Day 1-4):

When?: July 29-August 25th

What?: One photo each day to share #HowISpentMySummer on your favourite social media platform (Instagram or Twitter preferred, to Storify each topic each day) – see challenges for each date below!
Day 1 (July 29): Take a road trip
Day 4(July 30): Watch a play, a concert, or a movie outdoors
Day 3 (July 31): Take a hike, go bird-watching, or climb a mountain
Day 5 (August 1): Swim in the ocean or walk barefoot on a beach
Day 6 (August 2): Your choice — Post a picture or video about your summer!
Day 7 (August 3): Eat something from a roadside stand
Day 8 (August 4): Make a bonfire or campfire (singing optional)
Day 9 (August 5): Play frisbee, softball, or soccer in a park
Day 10 (August 6): Jump in a lake, do a cannonball Into a pool, or swim in the ocean
Day 11 (August 7): Your choice — Post a picture or video about your summer!
Day 12 (August 8): Visit with family or attend a family reunion
Day 13 (August 9): Tackle a DIY project at your apartment or house
Day 14 (August 10): Dance under the stars with someone/something you love
Day 15 (August 11): Eat homemade ice cream, gelato, or frozen yoghurt
Day 16 (August 12): Your choice — Post a picture or video about your summer!
Day 17 (August 13): Attend a fair, festival, or farmer’s market
Day 18 (August 14): Get married or attend a wedding; or take a class or graduate!
Day 19 (August 15): Read a book just for fun
Day 20 (August 16): Post a picture of a curiosity, statue, or sign from a trip
Day 21 (August 17): Your choice — Post a picture or video about your summer!
Day 22 (August 18): Spend an evening at an outdoor cafe
Day 23 (August 19): Sit on a porch or stoop and visit with your neighbors
Day 24 (August 20): Ride a ride at a fair or amusement park
Day 25 (August 21): Your choice — Post a picture or video about your summer!
Day 26 (August 22): Go on a picnic or fall asleep in a hammock
Day 27 (August 23): Wash a car with a garden hose or pick a wildflower bouquet
Day 29 (August 24): Pitch a tent, post a nature picture, or paddle on a river
Day 30 (August 25): Your choice — Post a picture or video about your summer!
Why?: To share with the #HigherEd & #EdTech community about your summer. These photos can be from this past summer, a #TBT summer memory, OR you can just make it something you wished to do this summer.

More about the challenge here: http://howispentmysummer.tumblr.com/ Thanks for the fun ideas and prompts, JJ! Looking forward to seeing how YOU spent your summer! 

#phdchat, Professional Development

What Are You Reading This Summer? #summerreading

This year, the summer months are providing me space to read articles and books that I have been collecting on my #ToRead list. Below is the first stack of books I have started to read this summer. Since I am not working on any classes this summer,  the plan is to read and annotate  more articles, e-books, and other literary finds I have been collecting and storing in my Delicious and in my Good Reads account. Get ready for some EXTREME READING!

#summerreading

Although my goals are to move forward on my dissertation proposal, I know that I am not alone in setting reading goals for the summer months. Both the NY Times and Grad Hacker want to kick off the #summerreading social media campaign on June 7th. I was able start on my summer reading list early with the help of my recent travel plans – so I am always looking to add book recommendations (both for research and fun).

What books are you reading? What’s on YOUR #summerreading list? What books do you recommend?

Learning Community, Professional Development

Wiki Summer Camp

Thinking about using a wiki for your learning environment? If so, you might want to head to PBWorks Summer Camp. This interactive, online forum is a great professional development opportunity for educators who wish to engage in discussion, complete assignments, watch virtual presentations and learn from other wiki mentors some best practices in the wiki-world.

happy logoHere is the PBWorks camp syllabus:

Week One: June 22-26

How to set up your wiki:

  • Wiki Structure
  • What lesson plans to wikify and how
  • Upload files – like your syllabus- and make it accessible from the front page
  • Important features used for this course
    • Folders
    • Tagging
    • Tables
  • Beginner tips from our Mentors!

Register for this week’s webinar on June 23rd at 10:00PST: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/497735667


Week Two: June 29- July 3

Interactive Media and How to use it: Review the media options on our educator site

  • Chat rooms – when they work and when not to use them
  • Videos – tips on video recording software for teachers, and how to quickly embedd videos on your wiki page
  • Images
  • What video and image services are there for educators to use for free

Round Table Chat with Kristine and the PBwiki Mentors

  • Hear from Mentors and find out where they struggled and where they succeeded with interactive media on their wiki.
  • What to be aware of when using photos, video and podcasts (aka – no personal photos on a public wiki!)
  • Learn step by step how to use the interactive media features.

Homework week two: (This should take 1.5 hours)

-or-

Register for this week’s webinar on June 30th at 10:00PST: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/913182851


Week Three: July 6 -10

Security features in PBwiki 2.0 — keep your work private!

  • User Permission levels and how to make changes
  • Folders & Folder security
  • Page level security

Demonstration of the PBwiki Security Features

  • The most important webinar of all — learn how to set security controls BEFORE your students join the wiki.

Homework week three: This should take 20 minutes

  • Create a new homework Week Three page & place it in the Week Three folder.
  • Go to the page on PBwiki Permission levels.  Read over the PBwiki permission levels and answer the questions. Respond to the questions on your week three homework page.
  • Go to the page on Folder Security.  Watch the three short videos and respond to the questions about folder security.  Respond to the questions on your week three homework page.
  • Go to the page on Page Security.   Watch the short videos and respond to the questions about page level security. Respond to the questions on your week three homework page.

Register for this week’s webinar on July 7th at 10:00PST: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/333808003


Week Four: July 13 – 17

Three ways to invite your students — including the BRAND NEW Classroom Accounts

  • Request Access
  • Upload email address
  • Automatically create accounts without email address (for students under 13)
  • How to introduce your wiki to students so it works
    • Parent permission forms
    • FAQ page
    • Sandbox
  • What to expect when your students take over
    • Wiki management

Live Discussion on inviting students and the suprising results

Homework week four: this should take 30 minutes

  • Set your notification setting in my.pbwiki.com to make sure you receive notifications of student changes
  • Upload your student email address, or print out your student accounts
  • Determine what invite menthod works for your class and discuss it on the forum

Register for this week’s webinar on July 14th at 10:00PST: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/983510451


Final:  Webinar Wrap up on July 21st

  • Review and new features for educators.

No Homework — Just new features for your workspace!

Register for this week’s webinar on July 21st at 10:00PST: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/756888211

Sounds intriguing? Then sign up HERE.