#3Wedu, Podcast, wine, women, WomenWhoWine.edu

Sharing Women’s Stories in Higher Ed with the NEW @InVinoFab Podcast #InVinoFab

The Women Who Wine, or #3Wedu podcast has been a cherished space for a small group of us (Patrice, Tanya, Jess, Nori & moi) to pour a glass of wine and chat about issues women face in higher education. As life evolves, so does the #3wedu podcast. With an interest in sharing and amplifying other women’s stories in higher ed, Patrice (@Profpatrice) and I have decided to create an audio-only podcast in a similar vain, called — In Vino Fabulum – which translates to In Wine, Story [Podcast Trailer]:

The #3Wedu podcast will continue the conversation and hopefully open up the pod-waves to bring new voices, ideas, issues, and movements. You might see the hashtag, #InVinoFab, but now we’ll have new guests on the audio-only podcast to share their story and have a bit of a chat/laugh. We welcome members of the higher education community to join the #3Wedu conversation to discuss issues and share what’s firing them up, specifically their interests, causes, work, movements, challenges, and more. We know there is a greater spectrum of voices among women, and we want to share these narratives.

The option to go audio only for this podcast is intentional. We think podcasting is an intimate space where fragile stories and perhaps sensitive topics could be shared. We recognize that some of our guests and their stories may want to remain anonymous on the web. We get and respect that — and we want to welcome others who want to share a public story openly or perhaps a private tale anonymously. Besides the longer format stories/interviews, you can expect to see some shorter episodes (5-15 minutes) we hope to put out in the coming months. These short stories, or vignettes, will include bits and pieces from the news, current events, relevant issues, and, perhaps, things we’re reading/watching/listening to. Of course, it would be wrong for us not to include a random fact or two about wine, right?

Here are a few of the recent episodes we launched off during Women’s History Month:

Our first guest for the 3Wedu: In Vino Fabulum podcast is, Dr. Ali Black (@draliblack) who shared with us her values around the ethics of care, gentle writing, and the importance of deep, thoughtful writing work with The Women Who Write.

Our conversation led us to talking about the women she writes with and how this type of support really empowered and encouraged herself and others in the group to reconsider how they approach their work, research, writing etc. with the systems and structures of our institutions. This women’s collective is one of many we see taking form at our colleges, universities, and within our society. I look forward to talking to more “wise women” and other packs of ladies who are re-writing their own way in postsecondary education. Speaking of packs, we did talk about wolves and what it means it means to be a “wild” women who embraces a wild nature:

“To establish territory. To find one’s pack. To be one’s a body with certainty and pride, regardless of the body’s gifts and limitations. To speak and act on one’s behalf. To be aware, alert. To draw on the enate feminine powers of intuition and sensing. To come into one’s cycles and to find what one belongs to. To rise with dignity and to retain as much consciousness as possible.”

~Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Women Who Run with the Wolves

If that quote has sparked your interest, you can find the full episode streaming from HERE with a complete set of show notes filled with resources here:

https://3wedu.wordpress.com/2018/03/23/episode-no-2-draliblack/

#InVinoFab: In Vino Fabulum Podcast

Do you have something to share with us? Are you working on an interesting project that involves women in higher education and/or wine? Why don’t you share your story with the #3Wedu community? Is there a topic you’d like to learn more about around women, wine, or higher ed?

You can also reach out to us by email: InVinoFabulum@gmail.com

BreakDrink, Podcast

Happy #InternationalPodcastDay 2017!

Do you listen to any podcasts? You should. Today, September 30th, is International Podcast Day (#InternationalPodcastDay)! The other day, my @BreakDrink podcast co-host, Jeff, and I chatted about this festive holiday for podcasting as we might be fans of podcasts (listen to @BreakDrink episode no. 1). Thanks, fellow podcast hosts @Katie__Linder & @bonni2018, for reminding us about this pod holiday last week!

International Podcast Day™ is September 30th and is an international celebration of the power of podcasts!  The celebration is a great opportunity to connect with fellow podcasters, podcast listeners, podcast enthusiasts, and leaders in the podcasting industry.  Help spread the word by telling your friends, sharing the celebration on your podcasts and social media feeds, and using #InternationalPodcastDay.  There are several ways to get involved and plenty to benefit from by taking part in International Podcast Day.  See our suggestions below.  But first, we must all “Start The Conversation” and share the power of podcasts!

YOU Can TOTALLY Get Involved with #InternationalPodcastDay By:

  • Checking out the #InternationalPodcastDay to learn about podcasts worldwide or share your own!
  • Grab your mic and camera, ask someone about their favourite podcast. Share on social media!
  • Join in numerous events in your region and around the world (Use the Googles).
  • Promote by posting the official banner image on your website.
  • Play the International Podcast Day audio or video promo on your show.
  • Change your social media image to the International Podcast Day logo
  • Explain to someone what a podcast is and get them hooked (it’s harder than you think)
  • Share your favourite podcast with someone (coworker, friend, teammate)
  • Send feedback to your favourite podcasters and tell them to thank you
  • Provide a rating and review in Apple Podcasts or other platforms
  • Subscribe to a new show and talk about it using #InternationalPodcastDay
  • Not a podcaster? Become one! (or think about it)
  • Listen to the recommendations, Jeff & I give on our podcast about it here:

These are our “go to” podcasts we recommend. These are friends of the pod and podcasts we have enjoyed, so we suspect you will as well. Take a listen to these recommendations from the @BreakDrink Team (and of course, you can check out our archives as well: http://breakdrink.com/).

Take a LISTEN to our podcast show recommendations online, streaming, or via your favourite podcast catcher subscription! ENJOY!!  Pod, on my friends! POD ON!

@ WORK Website
Teaching in Higher Ed http://teachinginhighered.com/episodes/
Radical Candor https://www.radicalcandor.com/blog/tag/podcast/
Research In Action http://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/research/podcast/
You’ve Got This http://ygtpodcast.com/
The Contrafabulists http://podcast.contrafabulists.com/
Higher Ed Live http://higheredlive.com/
Code Switch http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510312/codeswitch
CBC Spark http://www.cbc.ca/radio/spark
TOPcast https://cdl.ucf.edu/category/topcast/
The Anatomy of a Book https://acdigidbook.katielinder.work/podcast/
Note To Self http://www.wnyc.org/shows/notetoself
How I Built This http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510313/how-i-built-this
@ HOME Website
Crimetown https://gimletmedia.com/crimetown/
Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me http://www.npr.org/programs/wait-wait-dont-tell-me/
Hackable https://hackablepodcast.com/
What’s Good? http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510323/whats-good-with-stretch-and-bobbito
Radiolab http://www.radiolab.org/series/podcasts/
Two Dope Queens http://www.wnyc.org/shows/dopequeens
Politically Reactive https://www.politicallyreactive.com/
My Dad Wrote a Porno http://www.mydadwroteaporno.com/
It’s Been a Minute http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510317/its-been-a-minute-with-sam-sanders
Homecoming https://gimletmedia.com/homecoming/
This American Life https://www.thisamericanlife.org/podcast
On the Media http://www.wnyc.org/shows/otm/
@ SCHOOL Website
.future http://creative.gimletmedia.com/shows/future/
99% Invisible http://99percentinvisible.org/
Freakonomics http://freakonomics.com/archive/
Hidden Brain http://www.npr.org/series/423302056/hidden-brain
Reply All https://gimletmedia.com/reply-all/
Revisionist History http://revisionisthistory.com/
IRL Podcast https://irlpodcast.org/
Undone https://gimletmedia.com/undone/
TED Radio Hour http://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/
Rough Translation http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510324/rough-translation
On The Media http://www.wnyc.org/series/media-podcast
Pod Save America https://getcrookedmedia.com/here-have-a-podcast-78ee56b5a323
Planet Money http://www.npr.org/sections/money/127413729/podcast/
Sincerely, X https://www.ted.com/read/ted-podcasts/sincerely-x

Do you listen to a podcast in #highered OR other? Tell us about it: https://bit.ly/higheredpodcasts

More about our podcast project here: https://higheredpodcasts.wordpress.com/

Podcast, Professional Development, Research

The Higher Ed Podcast Project

Podcasts. This mobile, audio medium has been circling the Internet since 2004. Podcasting has evolved so much since its birth. Over the last few years, there’s been a growth of fantastic of podcasts to listen to and enjoy. If you have not heard someone talk about podcasts in the past few years, I would be very surprised. There are LOADS OF PODCASTS!!! Earlier this year, NPR podcasters spread the pod love via the #trypod campaign. The goal was to share what podcasts you listen to via the #trypod  hashtag. For just over a decade, I have enjoyed listening to a variety of podcasts on my commute, while running, on vacation, or just strolling with my pup. These portable stories, events, and news pieces have entertained and educated me on the go — it was like radio on-demand! My pod streams are filled with amazing content to enhance my personal and professional development and offer new insights about the world around me. I have learned so much from listening to podcasts – new ideas, book recommendations, or introductions to new people – there are so many takeaways pouring into my earbuds.  So many podcasts have contributed to my learning, teaching, research and practice in higher education … and I am not surprised to learn others subscribe to podcasts for their professional learning and development as well.

A growing number of higher education students, staff, and faculty are listening AND learning from podcasts. The wealth of information shared on a video/audio podcasts allows listeners to learn about resources, ideas, and information to enhance the work we do at our institutions. These mobile-friendly, portable PD resources are not only consumed, but they are also being created and produced by higher education colleagues and organizations. So what is the state of podcasting in higher ed?

To learn more about this and explore what is happing in post-secondary podcast land, let me introduce you to the Higher Ed Podcast Project.  We want to CURATE and SHARE podcasts impacting professional learning and development for higher ed peers, specifically to answer the following questions:

  • What video/audio podcasts are higher education professionals (graduate students, faculty, and staff) listening to for learning and development?

  • What podcasts are being produced/created for and in higher education (non-lecture/classroom-based)?

  • How has podcast consumption impacted or influenced the work (teaching, research, or service) you do in higher education?

Definition & Focus for Project

We are interested in exploring podcasts in higher education for professional learning and development; however, we want YOU to understand how we are defining a “podcast” as this medium has taken a number of shapes and forms over the years. For our research purposes, we are defining a podcast and our research focus as:

  • the podcast content is created and shared to support professional development, learning, and/or information distribution
  • the podcast has a target audience might include graduate learners (e.g. masters or doctoral researchers), professional school students (e.g. social work, medicine, etc.), staff/administration, and/or faculty in higher education
  • the podcast is in an audio and/or video format that can be subscribed, downloaded, and/or streamed from an electronic device (e.g. computer, laptop, tablet, or mobile)
  • the podcast is a program, show, broadcast, and/or episodes with a specific purpose or topic focussed on the higher education domain
  • the podcast includes original content development intention: it was designed for a podcast, e.g. we are not including a recorded college/university lecture, conference panel/presentation, professional learning webinars, recorded meeting, etc. (unless it was edited to fit into a podcast)
  • the podcast can be active or inactive

What podcasts are YOU listening to, Higher Ed?

To help this higher ed podcast project, we want to openly curate a LIST OF AUDIO and VIDEO PODCASTS dedicated to higher education professionals. This OPEN call for podcasts will help us understand and SHARE the current state of podcasting in higher education. This is where you come in. Please ADD to the higher education podcast list (and other podcasts on the second tab) to let us know what YOU listen to for your professional learning and development: 

http://bit.ly/higheredpodcasts

Want to learn more? Check out our research site: https://higheredpodcasts.wordpress.com/

BreakDrink, EdTech, Higher Education, Podcast

@BreakDrink Podcast, Episode No. 5: Digital Redlining with @hypervisible

In @BreakDrink episode no. 5, we chatted about LOADS of things related to our assumptions about access, policies, and practices in have higher education, specifically with regards to technology and learning. Last year for 2016 #OLCInnovate, I invited Chris Gilliard to share his work on Digital Redlining for a short “Ignite-like” talk. Why do we assume everyone has access to the Internet? Or a device? Or access to the same digital learning resources? What do we know or care about privacy and our data? Thanks for joining us to podcast on the topic, Chris. We suspect you’ll be back to chat more with us sometime about similar issues… and anime, of course

Here are a few show notes, ideas, and resources shared in @BreakDrink episode no. 5 with Chris:

Information Literacy, Filtering & Access

Online Access & Web Architecture

Do you KNOW what limitations to your search or access to your knowledge is like at your institution? Understanding Google Search Algorithms & SEO

Journal Access & Journal Databases: What are your resources or limitations? What can you not find that is not accessible on Google Scholar?

  1. Scholar Buddy Search – Find a friend at a larger university/college + ask them to search a topic (or borrow a password) to compare search results
  2. #icanhazpdf hashtag – Ask a friend on Twitter to email you the closed or pay-for-play publication
  3. Alternative creative ways to search: Find a romantic partner at a larger institution; academic citizenship acquisition? Or other ways to search for journal articles and here.

Searching Online & Information Literacy

The process of how information is shared needs to be explained. There are issues with walling-off information, the privatization of knowledge, and those who are moving towards a blockchain in higher ed. – explain what this means for limitations to information/knowledge.Do we teach our students to go beyond the first page hits on the Google search page? Do you know How Google Search Works? Much of our civic online literacy skills could be developed in order to hold ed tech & technology companies more accountable

Technologies in higher ed have many inequalities and technology is not neutral. Want to get more political for higher ed & #edtech? I’ll let Audrey Watters take this one: The Politics of Ed Tech Issues in higher ed are real for all of our campus stakeholders — students, staff, and faculty. These issues are around privacy, cyberbullying, trolling data security, and more. We need to be asking more about the technologies to learn what is ethically right and the limitations to these platforms, applications, and digital resources.

For a start, why don’t we learn more about privacy. Perhaps, it’s time we take a “short course” on privacy and what it means to be online, connected now. Check out the Privacy Paradox created by Note To Self. There are 5 podcasts and actions you do to take back your privacy & data. BONUS LISTEN: Privacy, Data Survivalism and a New Tech Ethics

We Need To Ask More About…

  • Do we really care about privacy online? Are we putting thoughts into the spaces and places online we are working with our learners?
  • Pew Research – State of Privacy in America  & Online Privacy & Safety articles
  • Do we know how our learners access educational materials and resources at our colleges/universities?
  • Cell-phone dependent students: the learner’s main access for Internet is their mobile device which is problematic as this is their main way to complete coursework, assignments, projects, etc.. (e.g. Educause 2015 mobile study & Case Study from Australia)
  • Do we think about the digital divide when considering our practices in higher ed for teaching, service & support?
  • Are we thinking about the platforms & apps we’re requiring our learners to use and how these technologies might be “sucking up their data”? We should.

@BreakDrink Books for Recommended Reading:

Here’s how to connect with Chris Gilliard to learn more about his work and this topic:

@BreakDrink Podcasts Shout Outs/Recommendations:

If you have comments, questions, or feedback about this podcast episode, please feel free to post a comment below, or follow us on the following the “BreakDrink” podcast channels:

We welcome banter & comments there. If y’all listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a rating and review.

Higher Education, Networked Community, Podcast, Professional Development, Research, StudentAffairs, Training & Development

Where’s Your Digital “Water Cooler” for Professional Development?

Social media has afforded a number of educators (both in higher ed and K-12) a space and place to share, learn, curate, and connect.  If you look online, you will find no shortage of educational hashtags, podcasts, blogs, Twitter chats, online groups, and more. These user-driven, digital communities are thriving as teachers, faculty, staff, and students seek out professional development virtually. It makes sense as social media PD is on-demand, socially integrated, accessible from a variety of devices, portable, and FREE!

Image c/o Killer Infographics (https://vimeo.com/89969554)
Image c/o Killer Infographics https://vimeo.com/89969554

Last week, I shared how our networked communities are a bit like a digital water cool for PD on Vicki Davis’ (@coolcatteacher) 10-Minute Teacher Podcast, episode no. 19: Social Media PD Best Practices #DLDay (or Listen on iTunes). Check out the wealth of resources from Vicki, that definitely spills past K-12 education sphere:

cropped-the-cool-cat-teacher-blog

In looking at these social media spaces, both for research and practice, I am grateful for the learning, support, and care I have received from my peers. I share about the #AcAdv Chat community on this podcast and how it has impacted my practices, with regards to how I support learners in academic advising and instruction. Not only has it been a form of PD, but I am thankful for the connections I have made on a personal level.  I have a number of #AcAdv colleagues have become close friends, and I value them well beyond being a Twitter follower or Facebook reaction in my feed.

These social technologies are connecting professional to help us in the workplace. They allow us to be more fluid to allow for us to search for ideas, share effective practices, offer just-in-time training, and broadcast our daily work experiences online.

to-be-in-a-profession-being-social-is-really-important-and-vital-for-our-practices-to-advance-and-you-dont-do-that-without-learning-from-one-another

These social media “water coolers” are having an impact on how we work in higher ed. It’s not the medium, per se, but we should examine how these platforms impact our social interactions and community development in the field. I believe social media affords us great opportunities for how we share information, curate knowledge, support professional learning, and apply ideas into our practice. That being said, there are challenges and issues we must also consider with regards to professional identity development, being in a networked space to learn, and how these mediums might influence our practice. As we talk with higher ed administrators and staff for our research study, we are beginning to chip away at the motivations for being part of a digital community, how practitioners value online spaces to support the work in higher ed, what does it mean to be a “public” professional online, and how personal/professional identity is complicated, evolving, and varies based on social media platform or how a community is support.  This research is SO fascinating…

We will share more about our findings soon. That being said, we are still collecting data AND interested in hearing about YOUR networked experience. Where is your digital water cooler on social media? Where do you go online to learn, share, and curate knowledge? How does being online and in these virtual spaces impact your professional (and personal) identity, growth, and career?

SURVEY: http://bit.ly/networkedcommunity

Here s a short, web-based survey that will take 15-20 minutes to complete. You will be asked questions about your online/digital communities of practice, and you will be given the option to share about your digital, online engagement.

INTERVIEW: http://bit.ly/networkedcommunityshare

We are interested in understanding more of your digital, networked self, which might include reviewing your digital presence on social media and other online platforms, and you may potentially be invited for one (1) interview lasting approximately 45-60 minutes in duration. During our interviews, we will ask participants to reflect on networked practices in online digital communities, inquire about your observations of these communities, ask about your interactions and contributions in the network, and discuss issues related to professional identity and professional influence in online spaces.