AcAdv

Implications for Use of Technology in Advising @NACADA 2011 National Survey

In Fall 2011, I was asked to review data collected from a national survey sponsored by The Global Community of Academic Advising (NACADA) and contribute to the chapter on advising technology. The survey posed a few questions about technology in advising, such as assessment of institutional advising types (e.g. online, on-campus, and blended), communication with advisees, and student information management practices. The entire 2011 NACADA National Survey results and chapters can be found in the NACADA Clearinghouse; and my chapter, “Implications for use of technology in advising 2011 National Survey” are available to read online.

One final sentiment I shared in the conclusion, was to push higher education administration to consider how they assess technology in advising as holistic process connected to other campus divisions:

“When assessing technology usage, postsecondary leadership must also consider future significant challenges such as economic pressures and new modes of scholarship (Johnson et al., 2012). Through researching these technological trends and challenges, conducting campus-wide assessments, and establishing strategic plans, advising stakeholders can effectively integrate technology in advising practices that support both advising units and institutional goals” (Pasquini, 2013).

I did include a few recommendations and guiding questions to consider when considering and  evaluating technology for advising:

“Many students bring expectations about using technology to campus, and therefore, many institutions participate in community advising approaches in which technological solutions provide seamless support and communication for academic planning and progression. When advising units address the use of technologies for both managing student information and communicating with students, they may impact student support and retention initiatives on campus. Higher education institutions, who deploy technologies for communication and information management, benefit from having both the data and ability to effectively connect to their student populations” (Pasquini, 2013).

What was key from this data analysis, was that the advising and a number of student service providers lack specific information about the WHY, WHAT, and HOW technology is being used in the advising profession. With the 2011 NACADA survey and encouragement from the NACADA Executive Office, development of the 2013 Technology in Advising Use in Higher Education Survey (which is still OPEN FOR RESPONSES until March 4, 2013 at 11:55 pm CDT) was initiated. I hope that this instrument helps us critically evaluate HOW the field of advising IS using technology at colleges and universities around the globe.

#AdvTech Use in #HigherEd Survey… Launches on 02-18-2013

In developing this instrument, our working group discovered that, overall, any assessment of technology in advising was lacking. The last time information about advising and technology was collected was circa 2002, and a number of the instrument items are already obsolete (e.g. overhead projectors, Netscape web browser, and Palm Pilots). Needless to say, information about where the advising community and technology stood was missing, and the overarching idea about use, perceptions, and  the current state for technology in advising.

Here are the objectives for the 2013 Technology in Advising Use in Higher Education survey:

  1. Establish what the current use of technology in advising among the advising profession – student management, regular use, applications, software, etc.
  2. Understand how technology in advising is being used for communication purposes with students, professionals and faculty
  3. Identify the relevance of technology for advising on a global scale for the advising profession
  4. Understand the current perspectives and perceptions of how technology in advising is being utilized in the profession today

So far we have 523 responses to the survey. The data collected will help to better inform the advising profession beyond anecdotal assessment, and critically evaluate how technological solutions effectively support our advising practice.  Without any real assessment for technology use in advising, how can we determine what direction we should move forward? I hope that survey responses and data analysis can provide some of these answers. More to come…

Reference:

Pasquini, L. A. (2013). Implications for use of technology in advising 2011 National Survey. NACADA Clearinghouse. Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/View-Articles/Implications-for-use-of-technology-in-advising-2011-National-Survey.aspx

AcAdv

2013 Technology in Advising (#AcAdv) Use in #HigherEd [SURVEY]

Dear Academic Advising Professionals, Faculty & Administrators in Higher Education,

The division of Undergraduate Studies at the University of North Texas (UNT) is hosting the 2013 Technology in Advising Use in Higher Education survey to assess how technology in academic advising is being utilized in colleges and universities around the globe. The NACADA Technology in Advising Commission sponsored study is designed to examine the current use and perception of technology in advising among academic advising professionals, faculty advisors, and advising administrators in higher education.

#AdvTech Use in #HigherEd Survey

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to respond to a 20-question survey, which will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete.  The questions will ask for your opinion of technology in advising use at your college and/or university institution, and your own perception about how technology is supporting the field of academic advising as a whole. Your responses are completely confidential and no individual participant will ever be identified with his/her answers.

SURVEY: 2013 Technology in Advising Use in Higher Education or cut and paste the following URL link into a web browser: http://bit.ly/AdvTechSurvey2013

This survey will close on Monday, March 4th at 11:55 pm CST.

If you have any questions or comments, please free to contact me. On behalf of the Global Community for Academic Advising (NACADA) and the advising profession, I would like to thank you for your time and input. Please pass this survey along to other advising faculty, professionals, and administrators at your college and/or university.

Thank you,

Laura Pasquini (@laurapasquini)

NACADA Technology in Advising Commission Chair 2011-2013

Academic Counselor, Office for Exploring Majors – Undergraduate Studies, UNT

This blog post is cross-posted at The Official NACADA Blog.

AcAdv, nacada

#UNT InHouse: Portrait Gallery

A couple weeks ago I was featured in the UNT InHouse Portrait gallery for my one of many hats I wear on campus. Here’s a bit more about the Portrait Gallery and my interview for the online publication:

It’s not possible to know everyone on a big, busy campus. So InHouse periodically publishes Portrait Gallery features to help us learn about our colleagues and their contributions to the university’s success. Send suggestions for Portrait Gallery subjects by email to InHouse with “Portrait Gallery” in the subject line.

Portrait Gallery: Laura Pasquini, Academic Counselor
Laura Pasquini helps students find an academic home as a mentor for undeclared majors. She’s also the first UNT representative to be chosen for the Emerging Leader Program with The Global Community for Academic Advising.  

What is your official title, and how long have you been at UNT?

I am an academic counselor and instructor for the Office for Exploring Majors in Undergraduate Studies and I have been working at the University of North Texas since June 2009.

What is your background?

I have been supporting students as an academic advisor/counselor with major or career decision-making since fall 2003. I have been fortunate to support a variety of student populations at Niagara University, Miami University, University of Toronto Scarborough, University of Texas Arlington and UNT. Before joining the new office for exploring majors team, I was an academic advisor with the College of Business Advising Office.

What will you do as a mentor?

I was selected as a mentor for the Emerging Leader Program with The Global Community for Academic Advising for the 2012-2014 class. As a mentor, I will collaborate with other advising professionals and faculty within the association from other institutions. I will help emerging leaders develop their connections to the advising profession, encourage leadership opportunities, assist colleagues in working toward their professional goals and give back to the professional association that has helped me thrive personally and professionally.

Has any of your experience at UNT helped you prepare for this position?

Both as an academic advisor in the College of Business and in my current role, I have been fortunate to connect with students, staff and faculty to support my own personal and professional development. As a former executive officer and member of the University Counselors Advisors Network, I was able to collaborate, learn, and connect to a wide variety of ideas that will enhance my mentoring. Most recently, I had the opportunity help coordinate the Spring 2011 Advising Retreat, the UNT Advising Conference and the Advisor Spring 2012 training day. I appreciate interacting with and learning from a variety of staff and faculty who love working with students on a daily basis.

Are you the first UNT representative to be a mentor for the Emerging Leader Program?

I am the first person at UNT to be an ELP Mentor; however Carol Pollard, senior counselor in the College of Music, was part of the inaugural ELP cohort in 2007-2009 as an Emerging Leader.

What do you do as an academic counselor for undecided majors?

The Office for Exploring Majors supports students in their journey to learn more about their major/career options. As a counselor, I help support students who are undecided, undeclared and uncertain about their degree options. We often work with new students who want to learn more about their academic choices; however we frequently work with students who want to change their major or transition to another path. I enjoy providing academic/occupational resources and information to empower our students to make choices, and support them in their exploration.

What commonalities/differences do undeclared majors share?

Our undeclared/undecided students are very intelligent, bright and interested in a number of options. These students often have too many choices and are undecided to allow some time to explore majors, meet faculty, understand degree requirements and discover more about their own interests. Over the last year, I have come to really appreciate the interest and enthusiasm that our students bring to the First Year Seminar, during workshops, or  counseling.

Do you have success stories?

A recent one would be with Lisandry Ortiz, who was in my First Year Seminar class Fall 2011.

Lisandry came into the class with different ideas about her major/career from her family, friends and others. During the course of the semester and in her first year, Lisandry went out to interview professionals, research occupational trends, and tried out a few classes to help her find her direction that would be best for her. She was interested in Biology, English, Creative Writing, Journalism, Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Studies with a double minor in Kinesiology and Addictions.

Although she had a challenging second semester at UNT, Lisandry managed to stay on top of her studies and credits the connections to friends and resources from the first year seminar class.

I am happy to say that Lisandry has earned junior class standing and has officially declared Rehabilitation Studies as her major with the College of Public Affairs & Community Service.

Along with her academic progress, Lisandry is working on campus as a housing ambassador in Maple Hall and she is now an Office for Exploring Majors Student Ambassador who will support undecided students with their major/career journey.

AcAdv, nacada, NACADA Tech

The @NACADA TechTalk Series – #AdvTech in 140 Characters Or Less

The @NACADA TechTalk Series is sponsored by the NACADA Technology in Advising Commission. These free, online webcasts were designed to introduce advising professionals and faculty to ideas and suggested practices for using technology in advising. **Join the Twitter backchannel & conversation using the #AdvTech hashtag**

Here is the NACADA TechTalk program run down for the week with descriptions in 140 characters or less and the archived recording, notes & more from each session:

Monday, August 6 – The Speech that was Never a Blog Post: Trends and Future for Technology in Advising

Join @NACADA President @uoadvdir as she shares future #AdvTech trends in #HigherEd that will impact your campus & advising #AcAdv
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Tuesday, August 7 – What the Tweet?: @AcAdvChat & the #AcAdv Community Using Twitter for Professional Development

Have u followed @AcAdvChat on Twitter? @peacox , @HowardSJ & @BilMorrill will share the conversation & community that is #AcAdv Chat #advtech

Wednesday, August 8 – Advising Technology Mythbusting: Guidance and Challenges for Using Social Media on Campus

Communications 101 + #SocialMedia Strategy + Privacy Concerns + #AdvTech Mythbusting = Web #AcAdv Tips from @julieclarsen@EricStoller

Thursday, August 9 – Advising Reflections & Sharing: Blogging to Support our Profession & Student Learning Outcomes

Blogs are for sharing, reflection & more! Listen to #AcAdv @jbarkemeyer , @sally_garner & @EstherChung2 tell their #AdvTech blogging tales.

Friday, August 10 – Technology Adoption & Life Cycle: From Implementation to Evaluation of Technology in Advising

So you have an #AdvTech idea? @gsteele1220 & @cschwenn have a plan for that! Come learn about #AcAdv tech life cycle from start to finish.

THANK YOU FOR ALL WHO CONTRIBUTED TO THE NACADA TECHTALK SERIES!

What an amazing and fun time we had. I hope you find the above resources helpful, and be sure to let us know what Technology in Advising issues you want to learn more about if we offer more NACADA TechTalks in the future.

AcAdv, Learning Technologies, NACADA Tech

Going Mobile for Academic Advising: Tablets, iPads & Protocols on Campus

Mobile computing is all around us. You don’t just have to read the EDUCAUSE Mobile IT in Higher Education 2011 report or glance over the Cell Internet Use 2012 from the Pew Internet & American Life Project to see the rise of mobile technology on campus. More of students, faculty, and staff in higher education are plugged into smartphones, using tablets, and access more online through their mobile device.

Like other entities in higher education, our advising office is considering what it would be like to use a tablet (iPad or Nexus 7 seem to be the front runners) in our daily working lives. I was charged with the task to identify potential uses and reasons why a tablet would be helpful for supporting students and our professional lives on campus – and also things to consider when implementing mobile technologies.

Image c/o EdTechMag

With the quick response from the fantastic NACADA Technology in Advising Commission Facebook Group, we crowdsourced helpful resources and ideas around using mobile technology. Here are few* potential uses of mobile technology for academic advising – the WHY & HOW we would use tablets :

  • Navigation of Online Campus Resources – share for students & others at appointments, events, for recruitment, resources fairs & more!
  • Increased Web Resources – more of our advising resources & job aids (systems, notes, etc) have moved online. The access to information and systems is critical for our daily work environments in higher ed.
  • Sustainability – Increasingly our advising materials are moving online and our campus is moving to a paperless environment. Instead of printing an agenda, file or document – you can view it on your tablet.
  • Improvement to Advising Process – Currently using a PDF advising document – to transition to an online web form that can be completed and emailed to the student & tracking
  • New Student Orientation – providing current information when advising, catalog, etc. as you are on the go and at different events & happenings on campus during the summer
  • Instruction & Presentation Needs – able to plug & play notes, PPT, web resources, & applications during a class, conference session or training
  • Ease of Registration – sometimes the process for online registration and class search needs some show & tell – advisors could help students waiting for appointments or reach out to students to enroll during peak times in other spaces on campus
  • Collaborative Communication – shared notes, capturing information  from meetings & reporting back on events, webinars, or training on/off campus
  • Getting Social [Media]: ability to capture events on video, record audio for podcasts, get others connected to these social spaces (show them) &  the ability to post, archive, save & share with the campus community in real time. Have you thought about your social media management lately?
  • Assessment – surveys, evaluations, on-the-spot feedback, or other ideas for review to collect student information and campus data.
  • Marketing & Promotion – create magazine style brochures, design better promotional materials & share presentations which are all electronic => ability for direct marketing at events/fairs/appointments that can be sent to other mobile devices or email accounts. [Here’s a video with a few examples from our Career Services friends as well & a great NACE article on the topic from @garyalanmiller.]
  • There’s An App for That – web applications can be used from the current Apple or Android market OR you can create your own app that shares helpful resources.
  • Creativity – inspires staff to consider other means, methods, and practices for better serving our students, getting their administrative tasks accomplished, and then some!

*This list is not extensive or all-inclusive. I appreciate and welcome any and all ideas for other uses for tablets for academic advising or other higher education functions on campus.

For those of you who are already using a mobile device, here are some “procedure/protocols” for iPads in Office shared by the current NACADA President, Jennifer Joslin [Thanks!!]:

iPad Procedures and Things to Know

How to set up your iPad:

There are instructions inside the box; open the iPad box and get everything out.

You will need an iTunes account. And you’ll need to make sure iTunes is installed with the latest version on your computer. {Insert Your Office Supply Purchaser’s Name Here} can help with the approvals you need for this. (If you already have an iTunes account for personal use, you can just use that. You do not need a separate account unless you want one.)

Follow the on-screen instructions. Do register your account under your name, but use the {Insert Your University E-mail Address} in the contact information. Do not download the “Find my iPad” app.

You can now sync your apps, music, etc., as desired.

Please set up the passcode security feature (in Settings > General > Passcode). For extra security turn off the Simple Passcode option on this page, which permits the use of longer (i.e. more secure) passcodes. It is also recommended to turn on the Auto-Lock feature on this page. This makes it so you will need to enter the passcode after the iPad is idle for a preset period of time. Shorter times are more secure.

{Insert Your IT Support Area Here} can help you sync your {Insert Your Preferred Client’s name} email, calendar and contacts to your iPad.

Important things to keep in mind:

The iPads are intended for work purposes. Please use them appropriately. There are many apps you can use for work that are free. Some good examples of this are iBooks, Evernote, Dropbox, Big Calc Free, the Oregon App, Facebook or Flipboard for Facebook, and either Twitter or Hootsuite for Twitter. If you would like additional apps on your iPad, it is your responsibility to pay for your own apps.

It’s important that we are careful about use of data. Sometimes you will use the VPN to access {Insert CRM/CMS, degree tracking, campus portal, and/or advising notes software of your campus here} to access a student’s record. It’s important to delete those screens when you finish for the day. Since accessing the web is very easy on the iPad (and there is no further security), it’s important not to leave student data readily available.

To set up the VPN follow this link: {Insert Your VPN URL Here}

{Insert Your Office Supply Purchaser’s Name Here} will assist us with labeling each iPad for inventory and tracking purposes. We have ordered cases and clear protective screen covers for daily use. We have also ordered a few of the attachments that will allow us to use the iPad for presentations.

If you have an iPad 3G (Directors), you must purchase your own data plan.

Do you have tips for using mobile technology on campus? Suggestions for protocol and use in the office for your staff/faculty? Ideas on how to use tablets for your work area in higher education? Please share your ideas and how you use your mobile technology on your college/university campus.