Social Media

Do You Have Social Media Goals?

After participating in today’s Social Media Metrics in Government Using GSA Guidelines webinar hosted by Hootsuite, I began to think more about the WHY and HOW social media guidelines and policies develop. This session discussed how the government developed their guidelines around their GSA social media goals which were connected to their strategic communication plan and web presence.

Obviously this webinar had a focus on measurement and assessment for social media use using both free and paid tools, like Hootsuite; however it offered some sound advice to organizations that are just developing social media guidance or for those who are re-thinking their social media policy. Instead of starting with a policy, strategy, or guideline list of what to do or not do, it would be more helpful for institutions to think through the WHY of social media. This process provides organizations focus, sets out objectives, and creates a rationale for social media use and how these goals might be measured and assessed. For example, the GSA wanted to use social media and social data goals, included:

  • Be more effective in how they distribute critical information to citizens & communities
  • Engage citizens to help shape to public programs
  • Better inform strategies leading to greater efficiency
  • Increase use of innovative tools and services to further development

It is important to consider your institutional goals when organizing your social media guidance, here a few suggestions given from the webinar – but I am sure your organization has many others.

Internal Considerations:

  • Collaboration
  • Knowledge sharing
  • Cost saving & cost avoidance strategy
  • To be transparent
  • Talent acquisition

External Considerations:

  • Citizen engagement – Active use and participation (2-ways)
  • Promote services and resources
  • Provide customer service – feedback
  • Provide real-time resources – expand upon current communication channels

Here are a couple of examples shared from the GSA for their use of social media goals:

Example of Goals for Using Social Media in Government

Another reason to consider developing social media goals before establishing your guidelines is to consider how you will evaluate social media use for your organization. Social media management of your resources is critical. To help assess social media engagement and use it will be helpful to align your goals to evaluation as part of your strategic communication plan. Social media analytics and metrics through different 3rd party tools and social dashboards; however what will be relevant for your organization to track and use for assessment purposes. You want to connect your goals to your key performance indicators (KPI) and desired evidence-based outcomes.

Planning for Measurement

One example was the use of hashtags from the Twitter for Public  Health case study to outline a clear system for planning social media management. This public health group utilized a hashtag, #SM4PH, to build hype around the start of a regular, organized Twitter chat and to launch a hashtag for community development. Their goal was to measure the impact of the hashtag use, conversation, and community involvement before, during, and after this first chat to assess the long tail of this campaign.

Does your organization or institution have social media goals? How do these goals support your social media spaces? How do you assess and measure your social media goals? Let me know.

Reference:

Macey, B. (2013, November 14). Social media metrics in government: Using GSA Guidelines – Webinar. HootSource. Retrieved from http://blog.hootsuite.com/social-metrics-gsa-guidelines/

UPDATE 11-19-13: If interested, this webinar is available for viewing on demand.

Professional Development, Reflections

#oneword2013 = ACTION

It’s that time of year… time to consider the #oneword2013. I think I embodied my #oneword2012, fantabulous, so I thought I might as well give #oneword2013 a go. 2013 has a great deal in store for me – there are a number of projects, deadlines, objectives, and initiatives I want to accomplish this year. My one word will move beyond TO DO lists, goals, New Years’ resolutions, or even wishes [sorry Daruma doll!].

Our goal is set for 2013 @FiachraM.Here's to our scholarly work & having our Daruma doll to remind us of our focus.
My #oneword2013 is ACTION! This word will remind me to be active and engaged in what I am doing. A little less conversation, a little more action. This means you should be seeing more verbs in my blog posts, such as researching, writing, moving, publishing, dancing, exploring, adventuring, trying, doing, completing, graduating, and challenging.

I have also decided to use the word ACTION to push me beyond my comfort zone. It’s time to visit new places, to try new things, and to enhance my learning and professional development. Whether it’s a road trip to a new location or learning a new sport (that involves a few bumps & bruises) – then why not? It’s a year for ACTION. Just do it!
Let's ride
What’s YOUR #oneword2013? Add yourself to the list.

#AcWri

#AcWriMo & Accountability to Write

Continuing with my blog “catch up” from the Fall 2012 semester theme…

I thought I’d share my #AcWriMo statistics for the month of November. In conjunction with #NaNoWriMo and #DigiWriMo, there are an avid group of academic scholars and early career researchers who “checked in” virtually to post their #AcWri goals and daily progress in a shared Google document.

So I decided to join in for #acwrimo in November to tackle a few writing projects and goals I had to hit by the end of 2012. This digital check in helped me track what I was doing. My goal was at least 750 words per day, as I found the 750words tool useful and a reasonable daily goal. In the end, my total number of words for the month of November 2012 = 60, 088 words!

I’m not sure if anyone really paid attention to what I was updating in the shared Google Excel doc, but  using 750words.com and tracking my own word count in a public space did remind me that I was not alone in my #acwri and publishing goals. This #AcWriMo word count sharing helped me keep tabs on my progress, and I was able to focus my attention to small milestones I have had for the bigger writing tasks, i.e. grant research, conference paper proposals, manuscript submissions edits, etc.

If you’re impressed with my stats and you want to increase your word count these days, then perhaps  a digital #acwrimo accountability is for you! A growing number of scholars continue to share #acwri goals and word count writing objectives each month here: Academic Writing Accountability 2013 spreadsheet.  Forget New Years resolutions for #acwri intentions, and focus on some S.M.A.R.T. goals for your scholarly writing this year.

Learning Community, NACADA Tech Seminar 2009

Projects & Ideas from Laura’s Learning Community

Great first meeting with the Learning Community (LC)! It sounds like many of you have different ideas, goals & reasons to attend. I hope that you are able to connect with others in our LC to brainstorm & share ideas on what sort of technologies you might take back to your home campuses. Here are a few that were mentioned from our first LC Session:

  • Contact & connect with more students
  • Retention & recruitment
  • Orientation & First Year students
  • First Generation students & limited web value
  • Grants (Title 3) & deciding how to best utilize resources/plans
  • Student Readiness Inventory
  • Online Advising Booking System & Database
  • Optimize limited resources due to fiscal cut backs
  • Adult online education programs
  • Online university models & online advising
  • Web-based surveys
  • Geography & isolation – need to connect
  • Degree audit programs
  • Technical support & talking to IT
  • Limited internet connection & experience (the students)
  • Costs of implementation

PHEW! Those are just a few, and I am sure that more will arise from our LC discussions. Please post any questions or discussion topics that you would like to address below. See you at 4:30 pm!