Podcast

Behind the Podcast: How Do you Pod, #HigherEd Hosts/Producers?

There seems to be growing number of higher ed podcasts. These are podcasts produced for, by, and about different aspects of higher education. This might be about the life of a faculty member, academic writing, teaching, scholarship or a particular discipline. There are a number of postsecondary podcasts about student affairs, learner support, technology, marketing, admissions, and general things happening at colleges and universities. I know this as I have been analyzing a few of these lately (here: https://higheredpodcasts.wordpress.com/) and I’m preparing to help others create their own podcasts (i.e. students, staff, and faculty).

Confession time: I may have started podcasting with @BreakDrink in 2010; however, I am really learning how to podcast now. In a recent conversation with Jeff on the last episode of BreakDrink, we had a candid conversation about how we tinkered and cobbled together our past and current podcast episodes … and the things we learned along the way.

From live episodes on BlogTalkRadio  and YouTube Live (formerly Google+ ON AIR LIVE hangouts) to thinking about audio, editing, and then some now,  we break down what’s behind our podcasting curtain in episode #30. Jeff and I also reflect about the process of thinking about WHAT you want to talk about and the WHY would you podcast — because recording and EDITING takes some effort to make it sound quality. These are some of the MANY things I have been thinking of for this form of digital storytelling… and there is more to come.

So much has changed in podcasting. There are so many MORE podcasts, different types, and others flooding into the audio market of narratives, interviews, panels, and promotion on the streams. There is SO much available to make a podcast that Podcasting for Dummies is on it’s THIRD edition (I know this, as I am studying and preparing my lessons with this text now!) and ways to share, host, and subscribe. There is NO shortage of “learn how to podcast” blog posts and websites that are a mix of hype, promise, and expensive equipment funded by search engine optimization, click ads, and empty promises to encourage you to buy into the hosts book, materials, etc. Some of this is good, and much of this is crap — as there are easier ways to start a podcast and play with this medium, if you are interested.

So… that being said, I thought I’d reach out to my own community to aggregate information from actual podcasts that I listen to in higher ed. I am doing this to share with campus stakeholders I’ll be working with over the next couple of months to share the work you do, how you do it, and, of course, promote YOUR podcast. My hope is to aggregate resources, promote your pods, and create a cohesive Creative Commons resource to share with my learners and YOU! This effort is to go “behind the podcast” (I miss you VH1) to understand how higher ed friends create and make their podcasts. I hope you can share resources, advice, and ideas for current/future pod producers, hosts, and makers. If you podcast or know someone who does in postsecondary education, please contribute to offer insights to peers about your technical troubleshooting and  audio experiments in the land of the pod here:

http://bit.ly/behindthepodcast

Here is the basic information I am hoping to aggregate in this open doc. It would be great to learn about the how, where, and what you podcast for your own higher ed pod AND feel free to add what you want based on these prompts:

  • Podcast (name):
  • Host(s):
  • Website or Where it Streams:
  • Social Media:
  • Describe your pod (brief description about the type of podcast/format):
  • Hardware (mic, earphones, etc.):
  • Software (recording, editing, etc.):
  • How do you host/produce your pod (in-person, Skype, etc.):
  • Where do you record (describe and/or post a photo) – share your #podcaststudio:
  • Hosting Services (Libsyn, Buzzsprout, SoundCloud, etc.):
  • Resources, reads and/or advice for podcast hosts/producers (things you’ve learned):

Thanks pod friends! I appreciate your help. #PodSaveHigherEd

#HEdigID

#HEdigID Chat No. 8: #SocialMediaLife These Days

Love it or hate it, social media is a part of our daily lives. It’s not a trend or fad that is going away. Social media is deeply embedded into our every day activities, how we communicate, how many find news and information, and it supports our relationships near and far. Almost everyone, young and old, are now active in various social media platforms due to the tethering there is to portable smart devices (phones, tablets, watches, and more) and increased access and availability to the Internet (WiFi, 4G, etc.).  After listening to the recent @mozilla IRL Podcast episode “Kids These Days” with Veronica Belmont, Manoush Zomorodi, and Alexandra Samuel, I was concerned about if the “kids” were alright — that is the teens AND adults who have report daily social media.

The two 2018 reports from the US are interesting to compare how we are thinking about our #SocialMediaLife whether we are young or old:

 

Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences (2018)via @CommonSense Media (n=1,141)

  • 89% of teens with a smartphone (ages 13-17)
  • 70% of teens who use social media multiple times a day
  • Snapchat (41%), Instagram (22%), and Facebook (15%) are the social media sites these teens use the most
  • 72% of teens believe that tech companies manipulate users to spend more time on their devices

Social Media Use in 2018 Report* via @PewResearch (n=2,002)

  • YouTube (73%), Facebook (68%), Instagram (35%), Pinterest (29%), Snapchat (27%), LinkedIn (25%), Twitter (24%), and Whatsapp (22%) of US adults say they use social media online or on their cellphone
  • A majority of adults visit Facebook (51%), Snapchat (49%), Instagram (38%), Twitter (26%), and YouTube (29%) on a daily basis

*That being said, I’m curious what the future report of adult social media use will be after learning about Facebook data scraping at congressional hearings, recent visits to congress by Twitter and Facebook, and questions if we should break up with these social media platform monopolies (e.g. Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp). I suspect much has changed since this report was released in March 2018.

Much of the recent #SocialMediaLife of Teens shared in the recent Common Sense study is reflecting what I am learning about adults on these platforms as well. As Veronica said, “Teens. They’re just like us!” There is a growing concern about behaviors, practices, and social interactions among my peers who need role models and mentoring just as much as the youth. There are similar patterns and concerns about #SocialMediaLife I am learning about from higher ed professionals (faculty and staff), my adult learners (online and face-to-face students) and among my peers (friends, family, colleagues, etc.). There is no shortage of emotions, thoughts, reflections, and reactions to how we are now thinking about social media in our lives. Let’s unpack this recent report about teens to see how much different we actually feel about these social platforms in our day-to-day life. Join me for the open, online conversation, won’t you?

#HEdigID CHAT TOPIC: #SocialMediaLife These Days

The next Higher Ed Digital Identity SLOW chat will be on Twitter with the hashtag: #HEdigID and #SocialMediaLife paired with this OPEN Google doc of questions: http://bit.ly/hedigid8

Learn more about the #HEdigID Chat and review the QUESTIONS in that will be posted on Twitter and in the Google doc the discussion ALL DAY on FRIDAY, September 14, 2018:

  1. What is your preferences for communication with family/friends? VOTE NOW HERE: Twitter Poll
  2. Related to #HEdigID Q1: Has using #socialmedia and your devices changed the way you communicate with friends, family, colleagues, etc.? Please share how your #SocialMediaLife or how technology has shaped the ways you interact and communicate with others.
  3. The @PewResearch report from March 2018 found that a majority of adults visit Facebook (51%), Snapchat (49%), Instagram (38%), Twitter (26%), and YouTube (29%) on a daily basis. Is this true for YOUR own practice? Please share your thoughts/use on these platforms now.
    • VOTE: Identify the ONE social media platform you use the MOST on a daily basis {Twitter Poll to be added}
  4. In looking at the @CommonSense #SocialMediaLife of Teens Study 2018 [https://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/social-media-social-life-2018], was there anything that stood out in this report that YOU want to talk about today? [Developing questions and prompts for the #HEdigID chat for later].
  5. “72% of teens believe that tech companies manipulate users to spend more time on their devices” @CommonSense What is your perspective on how your devices and these #socialmedia platforms strive to get your attention? How do you deal with this distraction? #socialmedialife
  6. “Teens are much more likely to say #socialmedia has a positive rather than a negative effect on how they feel (e.g. less lonely, depressed, anxious and more confidence, popular, etc.)” @CommonSense Does this resonate with YOUR feelings about your #SocialMediaLife? Please share.
  7. #HEdigID QUESTIONS & OPEN CHAT: To be determined (see question no. 4 and respond!)…

Join the discussion on #SocialMediaLife today:

  • Tweeting your response with the hashtag: #HEdigID

  • Answer IN this Google Doc: http://bit.ly/hedigid8

  • Use these questions to draft your own reflection OR response (e.g. blog, video, audio, drawing or discussion)

 

Update: Transcript from this #HEdigID chat can be found HERE