Collaboration, web 2.0

Web 2.0 Goes to Work (for Education, Too!)

The McKinsey Quarterly presented a great business model of 6 ways that web 2.0 technologies can go to work for managers:

1. The transformation to a bottom-up culture needs help from the top.

2. The best uses come from users—but they require help to scale.

3. What’s in the workflow is what gets used.

4. Appeal to the participants’ egos and needs—not just their wallets.

5. The right solution comes from the right participants.

6. Balance the top-down and self-management of risk.

I would argue that these business practices can also support best practices in higher education. If we think about our students, faculty & staff in our “business model” this might be a few things to consider on how to get web 2.0 to work for education:

1. Students need to part of the development & process of education.

2. Go to where students are – use the technologies are being used.

3. Incorporate web 2.0 tools into current resources & services

4. Interact & provide feedback to activity online.

5. Target tech-savvy students & staff to help facilitate online learning initiatives among peer groups.

6. Encourage online contributions from students with some moderation.

Collaboration, Social Media, Virtual Communities, web 2.0

Successful Virtual Communities

Here’s the latest video post from Howard Rheingold who writes about cultural, social and political implications of modern communication media such as the Internet, mobile telephony and virtual communities (term he coined).

rheingold

Here is the full video: http://unescochair.blogs.uoc.edu/18022009/rheingoldlargevideo/

It’s pretty straight-forward and summarizes a great deal of what is being discussed and shared by adminstrators & educators within higher education. He presents his thoughts about social media and facilitating online collaborative communities in this clip, which I find very interesting.

Other learning pieces and items by Rheingold that you should check out include: